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November 22 1963 - Reflections on the Life Assassination and Legacy of John F Kennedy - cover

November 22 1963 - Reflections on the Life Assassination and Legacy of John F Kennedy

Dean R. Owen

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing

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Summary

A collection of interviews representing “an immense cross section of Americans’ grief and groping for comprehension” over the tragic death of JFK (Kirkus Reviews).   In November 22, 1963, award-winning journalist Dean Owen curates a fascinating compendium of discussions and thought-provoking commentaries from men and women connected to that notorious Friday afternoon when the thirty-fifth president of the United States was assassinated. Those who worked closely with the president, civil rights leaders, celebrities, prominent journalists, and political allies are among the many voices asked to share their reflections on Kennedy’s legacy and the significance of that day. Owen presents over eighty conversations, including those shared with:   Tom Brokaw, former Nightly News anchorReverend Billy Graham, Christian EvangelistLetitia Baldrige, former Chief of Staff to First Lady Jacqueline KennedyCongressman John Lewis, sole survivor of the “Big Six” black leaders who met the president after the March on Washington in August of 1963Robert F. Kennedy Jr., son of Robert F. Kennedy and nephew of President Kennedy   Beginning with a touching foreword from renowned author and journalist Helen Thomas, whose long tenure in the White House Press Corps began in the Kennedy administration, November 22, 1963 explores not only where America was fifty years ago, but how it has progressed since that tragic moment. A commemorative and insightful read, this book will unite generations.

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