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The Zeppelin Offensive - A German Perspective in Pictures and Postcards - cover

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The Zeppelin Offensive - A German Perspective in Pictures and Postcards

David Mark

Publisher: Air World

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Summary

Airship propaganda that’s “a visual treat . . . it will appeal to all those interested in how artwork was harnessed to convey information in time of war” (Firetrench).   Books on the Zeppelin raids during the First World War have, traditionally, focused on the direct impact of Britain, from the devastating effects on undefended towns and cities, the psychological impact of this first weapon of total war to the technological and strategic advances that eventually defeated the “Baby Killers.” Now, drawing on the largest postcard collection of its kind and other period memorabilia, David Marks tells the story of the Zeppelin during the First World War from a viewpoint that has rarely been considered: Germany itself.   From its maiden flight in July 1900, the Zeppelin evolved into a symbol of technology and national pride that, once war was declared, was at the forefront of German’s propaganda campaign. The Zeppelin links the rampant xenophobia at the outbreak of the conflict against England (it almost never was called Britain), France, Russia and their allies to the political doctrines of the day. The postcards that profusely illustrate this book show the wide-ranging types of propaganda from strident Teutonic imagery, myths and legends, biting satire and a surprising amount of humor. This book is a unique contribution to our understanding of the place of the Zeppelin in Germany’s culture and society during the First World War.   “Well-recommended for its unique visual and psychological insights.” —Over the Front   “Perfectly conveys the early optimism of the Zeppelin as both a symbol of national prestige and the weapon which would win the War.” —Donna’s Book Blog

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