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Crusader and Covenanter Cruiser Tanks 1939–45 - cover

Crusader and Covenanter Cruiser Tanks 1939–45

David Fletcher

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

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Summary

The Covenanter (which never saw active service) and Crusader Cruiser tanks were developed between 1939 and 1940. The Crusader first saw action in the North African desert in June 1941: its speed and sleek design made it a hard target to hit, and the tank was well-respected by the Afrikakorps for its velocity in combat. But its hurried development prior to World War II also made it prone to mechanical failure. This book examines the Covenanter and the many variants of the Crusader tank, detailing the designs, developments and disappointments of these infamous World War II tanks.

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