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Poems for Young and Old - cover

Poems for Young and Old

David Farren

Publisher: The Conrad Press

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Summary

This collection of poems is engaging, amusing and sometimes downright hilarious. An occasional dip into nonsense provides a wonderful distraction from everyday worries!
 
I wrote this book
So you could look
To see what I had written,
And that in a while
You would smile
And with its characters you’d be smitten.

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