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The Apollo Missions - The Incredible Story of the Race to the Moon - cover

The Apollo Missions - The Incredible Story of the Race to the Moon

David Baker

Publisher: Arcturus Publishing

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Summary

Few events have matched the landing of the first man on the Moon for drama and excitement. Watched live on television by 600 million people, Neil Armstrong floated down from the final step of the Eagle's ladder onto the powdery surface of the Moon, uttering the famous line, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind."
 
The Apollo Missions relives the experience and all the drama as it unfolded, from the birth of the Apollo space programme and the very first attempts to put an American astronaut into space to Apollo 11's successful Moon landing and its celebrated final splashdown in the Pacific Ocean.
 
Packed with awe-inspiring photographs of the space missions, astronauts, and iconic views of the Earth and the Moon, as well as technical diagrams, flight plans, and tables of statistics, The Apollo Missions tells the thrilling story of the race to the Moon.

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