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Introducing Bertrand Russell - A Graphic Guide - cover

Introducing Bertrand Russell - A Graphic Guide

Dave Robinson, Judy Groves

Publisher: Icon Books

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Summary

Bertrand Russell changed Western philosophy forever. He tackled many puzzles--how our minds work, how we experience the world, and what the true nature of meaning is. In "Introducing Bertrand Russell "we meet a passionate eccentric, active in world politics, who had outspoken views on sex, marriage, religion, and education.

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