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Tin Foil Recipes - Northwoods Cooking Series #3 - cover

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Tin Foil Recipes - Northwoods Cooking Series #3

Darren Kirby

Publisher: Darren Kirby

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Summary

The Best Tin Foil Recipe Book - Period! 
  
While recipes for tin foil are available across the internet, they are scattered and would take a long time to pull together. Fortunately, you don't have to! Finally, in this one collection, are some of the best tin foil recipes available anywhere. 
  
This recipe book is designed with efficiency and the outdoors in mind. All recipes are easy, fun and delicious. Try out breakfast recipes like Lumberjack Breakfast Packets, or fill up with a fun Campfire Pizza Log, and then finish your day with a treat like Cinnamon Monkey Bread Foil Packets. 
  
Tin Foil Recipes will be the outdoor cookbook you'll turn to again and again while camping, hiking, or just enjoying your backyard fire pit. So break out your tin foil and try something tasty!

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