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The Functions of Government - cover

The Functions of Government

Dapray Muir

Publisher: Dapray Muir

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Summary

The Functions of Government is a book about what governments do–not their philosophy, not how they operate, not how they get appointed, but rather what governments generally do and have done throughout history. It explores the origins of government and the various issues that gave rise to governments and how different countries addressed them. It will attempt to show how much various governments, despite differences in form and philosophy, have in common.
While certain functions appear to be more fundamental than others--defense more important than communications; health more important than trade regulation--what functions require communal attention vary according to the place and times.
Whether a government should provide health care, build railroads, and regulate banks are matters for politics; this book is about matters that governments commonly do address or have addressed in the past. It attempts to draw examples from around the world, as well as examples from ancient and medieval history.
Available since: 06/20/2020.

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