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Rooftop Revolution - How Solar Power Can Save Our Economy-and Our Planet-from Dirty Energy - cover

Rooftop Revolution - How Solar Power Can Save Our Economy-and Our Planet-from Dirty Energy

Danny Kennedy

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers

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Summary

The Biggest Untold Economic Story of Our Time

Here is the truth that the powerful Dirty Energy public relations machine doesn’t want you to know: the ascent of solar energy is upon us. Solar-generated electricity has risen exponentially in the last few years and employment in the solar industry has doubled since 2009. Meanwhile, electricity from coal has declined to pre-World War II levels as the fossil fuel industry continues to shed jobs.

Danny Kennedy systematically refutes the lies spread by solar’s opponents—that it is expensive, inefficient, and unreliable; that it is kept alive only by subsidies; that it can’t be scaled; and many other untruths. He shows that we need a rooftop revolution to break the entrenched power of the coal, oil, nuclear, and gas industries  Solar energy can create more jobs, return our nation to prosperity, and ensure the sustainability and safety of our planet. Now is the time to move away from the dangerous energy sources of the past and unleash the amazing potential of the sun.

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