Do you dare to read without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Moses and Curio: Volume 1 - cover

Moses and Curio: Volume 1

Daniel Glenn

Publisher: Linville Press, LLC

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

Get ready to root for the ruthless when this couple steps onto the stage...and if you are wise, always remember...you never saw a thing!
Moses Holliday and Curio Phelonie work together as hired killers, collecting bounties on marked souls across the various landscapes of the Deep South, during the changing times of the early 1990's. 
Passionate only about both plying their dark trade successfully and returning to their bayou lair to savor a tender embrace that may always be their last, this unlikely couple discover each other's dark pasts and enjoy that rarest of occurrences- raw, mutual adulation - as they carry out the lethal whims of their employers, the notorious Fontenot brothers.
In this first of four in a series of novels by new author Daniel Glenn, follow the exploits of these sexy and unorthodox partners as they channel their physical energies into an enthralling collection of tales of murder for hire and love without the usual boundaries or platitudes of "normal" couples. For Moses and 
(Continued on Back Flap)
Curio, "until Death do us part" is not just a catchphrase, it is a daily possibility and they live accordingly.
Locked and loaded with kinky interludes, warped personalities, shocking turns of fortune, and riveting encounters with enemies from all walks of life, these diverse chapters feature one wickedly tantalizing, and, very captivating, couple who will stop at nothing to keep on living and loving.

Other books that might interest you

  • Graphic Satire in the Soviet Union - Krokodil's Political Cartoons - cover

    Graphic Satire in the Soviet...

    John Etty

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    After the death of Joseph Stalin, Soviet-era Russia experienced a flourishing artistic movement due to relaxed censorship and new economic growth. In this new atmosphere of freedom, Russia's satirical magazine Krokodil (The Crocodile) became rejuvenated. John Etty explores Soviet graphic satire through Krokodil and its political cartoons. He investigates the forms, production, consumption, and functions of Krokodil, focusing on the period from 1954 to 1964.Krokodil remained the longest-serving and most important satirical journal in the Soviet Union, unique in producing state-sanctioned graphic satirical comment on Soviet and international affairs for over seventy years. Etty's analysis of Krokodil extends and enhances our understanding of Soviet graphic satire beyond state-sponsored propaganda.For most of its life, Krokodil consisted of a sixteen-page satirical magazine comprising a range of cartoons, photographs, and verbal texts. Authored by professional and nonprofessional contributors and published by Pravda in Moscow, it produced state-sanctioned satirical comment on Soviet and international affairs from 1922 onward. Soviet citizens and scholars of the USSR recognized Krokodil as the most significant, influential source of Soviet graphic satire. Indeed, the magazine enjoyed an international reputation, and many Americans and Western Europeans, regardless of political affiliation, found the images pointed and witty. Astoundingly, the magazine outlived the USSR but until now has received little scholarly attention.
    Show book
  • The Battle Begins - The Story of Creation - cover

    The Battle Begins - The Story of...

    Caleb Seeling

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Even as God walked through the beauty of His new creation, and breathed life into Adam, His masterpiece ... a warrior-angel gives into his pride—and commits the ultimate betrayal. Witness Adam and Eve falling into Lucifer's trap, as the battle for eternity begins in this brilliantly presented retelling of Creation, the Fall, and God's promise of redemption.  
    Show book
  • Emotions Explained with Buff Dudes - Owlturd Comix - cover

    Emotions Explained with Buff...

    Andrew Tsyaston

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    "You know how, since the dawn of humanity, great philosophers and poets have dedicated their entire lives to exploring concepts like love, life itself, logic, and sorrow? Well, those great philosophers and poets are dead now, so I win." — ShenEmotions Explained With Buff Dudes is your fully illustrated guide to the hyper-conflicted, tragicomic feelings of our age. Featuring the resilient, shaggy-haired Shen, this debut collection of Owlturd Comix is a tale of triumph and survival — of getting your ass kicked by sleep deprivation and student loans, but never losing hope. Most of all, it's an amusing, instructive journey through a vast array of emotions, including those best explained with dudes who are buff. 
    Show book
  • Hellboy's World - Comics and Monsters on the Margins - cover

    Hellboy's World - Comics and...

    Scott Bukatman

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Hellboy, Mike Mignola’s famed comic book demon hunter, wanders through a haunting and horrific world steeped in the history of weird fictions and wide-ranging folklores. Hellboy's World shows how our engagement with Hellboy's world is a highly aestheticized encounter with comics and their materiality. Scott Bukatman’s dynamic study explores how comics produce a heightened “adventure of reading” in which syntheses of image and word, image sequences, and serial narratives create compelling worlds for the reader’s imagination to inhabit. Drawing upon other media—including children’s books, sculpture, pulp fiction, cinema, graphic design, painting, and illuminated manuscripts—Bukatman reveals the mechanics of creating a world on the page. He also demonstrates the pleasurable and multiple complexities of the reader’s experience, invoking the riotous colors of comics that elude rationality and control and delving into shared fictional universes and occult detection, the horror genre and the evocation of the sublime, and the place of abstraction in Mignola’s art. Monsters populate the world of Hellboy comics, but Bukatman argues that comics are themselves little monsters, unruly sites of sensory and cognitive pleasures that exist, happily, on the margins. The book is not only a treat for Hellboy fans, but it will entice anyone interested in the medium of comics and the art of reading.
    Show book
  • Snug Harbor Stories - A Wallace the Brave Collection! - cover

    Snug Harbor Stories - A Wallace...

    Will Henry

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    Think "Peanuts" if Charlie Brown were less of a mope or "Calvin & Hobbes" if Calvin weren't a bit of a psychopath. "Wallace The Brave" is about a family. There's Dad, a fisherman, Mom, a gardener, their almost feral young son Sterling, who never met a bug he wouldn't eat, and his older brother Wallace, a rambunctious, imaginative kid big on exploring. Mostly we see the world of the strip through Wallace's eyes, a sleepy East Coast beach town called Snug Harbor where the streets are lined with ice cream shops and the beaches are dotted with rocky tide pools ... The world of childhood depicted in the strip is a timeless, outdoorsy one reminiscent of strips like "Calvin & Hobbes" and "Cul De Sac," both of which Henry cites as influences. — NPR's Glen Weldon 
    Show book
  • It's Not Funny If I Have to Explain It - A Dilbert Treasury - cover

    It's Not Funny If I Have to...

    Scott Adams

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Office workers, cubicle squatters, and corporate drones everywhere read Dilbert in their morning papers and see their own bosses and coworkers in the frames of the strip, enacting on newsprint the weird rituals and bizarre activities that are conducted each day in the American workplace. The characters' names and hairstyles have been changed to protect their identities, but Dilbert's readers aren't fooled. After all, they spend every day with these idiots and lunatics.
     
    Jargon-spewing corporate zombies. The sociopath who checks voice mail on his speaker phone. The fascist information systems guy. The sadistic human resources director. The technophobic vice president. The power-mad executive assistant. The pursed-lip sycophant. The big stubborn dumb guy. They're Dilbert's coworkers, and chances are they're yours, too. If you know them, work with them, or dialogue with them about leveraging synergies to maximize shareholder value, then you'll recognize this comic strip as a day at the office, only funnier!
     
    Since 1989 Dilbert has lampooned not only the people but also the accepted conventions and practices of the business world. Office politics, management trends, business travel, personnel policies, corporate bureaucracy, irrational strategies, unfathomable accounting practices, unproductive meetings, dysfunctional organizations, oppressive work spaces, silly protocols, and inscrutable jargon are all targets of Adams's darkly goofy satirical pen. Dilbert strikes a deeply resonant chord with fans because it casts such a dead-on reflection of the realities of the white-collar workplace, even with its off-the-wall delivery.
     
    It's Not Funny If I Have to Explain It, features Adams's personal all-time favorite selections, along with his own handwritten commentary about the strips. 
    Show book