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The Last Raid: How World War II Ended August 1945 - cover

The Last Raid: How World War II Ended August 1945

Daniel Ford

Publisher: Warbird Books

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Summary

While the Japanese war cabinet argued about whether to surrender, and on what terms, the U.S. Army Strategic Air Force on Guam and Tinian geared up for a thousand-plane raid upon the Empire. It would be the last air raid of the Second World War. This little book, which first appeared in Air & Space / Smithsonian magazine on the 50th anniversary of the war's end, tells the story of those momentous forty-eight hours. Revised and expanded for e-book publication, including: a portfolio of photographs and a history of the B-29 project. About 7000 words.

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