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The Poems - cover

The Poems

D. H. Lawrence

Publisher: RosettaBooks

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Summary

A collection of modern English poetry from the celebrated author of Lady Chatterly’s Lover. This definitive collection of D. H. Lawrence’s poems, both previously published and some not, presents here with the poems in their intended forms, reversing censorship and correcting long-missed errors for the first time. The texts are accompanied by a comprehensive study of the composition, publication and reception of Lawrence’s most iconic poetry.

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