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Pillow Thoughts - cover

Pillow Thoughts

Courtney Peppernell

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

Pillow Thoughts is a collection of poetry and prose about heartbreak, love, and raw emotions. It is divided into sections to read when you feel you need them most.

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