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A Big Pile of Blarney - cover

A Big Pile of Blarney

Colin Murphy, Brendan O'Reilly

Publisher: The O'Brien Press

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Summary

The Irish are world masters at talking. The magic behind our silky, colourful (and non-stop) stories is a little thing called ‘blarney’, or ‘the gift of the gab’. But what is it, you ask, and how can you get some for yourself?

 
The hilarious A Big Pile of Blarney takes you through the history of Blarney Castle and the legend of the world-famous Blarney Stone (not to mention the famous lips that have puckered up to it). By the time you’ve finished reading, you too will be overflowing with beguiling blarney know-how and mellifluous oratorical magnetism!

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