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The Dambuster's Squadron - cover

The Dambuster's Squadron

Colin Higgs, Bruce Vigar

Publisher: Pen & Sword Aviation

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Summary

They were the Dambusters  the pilots and crew of the RAFs elite 617 Squadron. They flew the most difficult missions. They breached the Dams! They sank the Tirpitz! They were the only squadron to drop the immense Grand Slam bombs and with them they destroyed bridges, viaducts and even Hitlers impregnable U-boat pens.In this unique book, introduced by Dams raid survivor, George Johnny Johnson, authors Colin Higgs and Bruce Vigar present no less than nine exclusive interviews with men who flew and fought in 617 Squadron during the Second World War. These men took part in virtually every operation the Squadron flew and went on some of the most daring and dangerous missions of the war. The result is one of the most vivid and unforgettable accounts of the RAF at war ever written.
Available since: 05/08/2013.
Print length: 196 pages.

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