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In a Dream You Saw a Way to Survive - cover

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In a Dream You Saw a Way to Survive

Clementine von Radics

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

This collection bravely explores life at its darkest and most inspiring moments—drawing on central themes of love, loss, mental health, and abuse. An attempt to understand and to be understood, In a Dream You Saw a Way to Survive is an ode to vulnerability that delivers concentrated, thought-provoking, and earnest verse.

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