Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Marching from Defeat - Surviving the Collapse of the German Army in the Soviet Union 1944 - cover

Marching from Defeat - Surviving the Collapse of the German Army in the Soviet Union 1944

Claus Neuber

Translator Tony Le Tissier

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

In this WWII memoir, a Nazi soldier recounts his desperate retreat from Russia, offering rare insight into the collapse of Hitler’s Army Group Central. 
 
In June of 1944, the Red Army launched a massive offensive that crushed Hitler’s forces in Belarus. German soldiers who weren’t captured had to fight their way back towards their own lines across hundreds of miles of enemy territory. This is the story of one of them, Claus Neuber, a young artillery officer who describes in graphic detail his experiences during that great retreat. 
 
Neuber’s account carries the reader through the desperate defensive battles and rearguard actions fought to stem the relentless Soviet advance and breakout from the cauldrons between Minsk and the Beresina river. After almost seventy days as a fugitive, depending on the kindness of villagers, enduring extremes of cold, wet and hunger, Neuber found his way back to the German lines.  
 
This personal narrative, translated for the first time from the original German, gives a dramatic insight into the impact of the Soviet offensive and the disintegration of an entire German army. It vividly records in day-to-day detail the experience of such a bitter defeat.
Available since: 04/30/2020.
Print length: 205 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Voices from the World of Jane Austen - cover

    Voices from the World of Jane...

    Malcolm Day

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Wonderful . . . a splendid overview of Georgian history—upstairs and downstairs” (Publishing News).   This is a fascinating collection of first-hand accounts of life in the time of Jane Austen, from 1775-1817, showing how social standing and etiquette were prime considerations of the period and revealing the stark contrasts between classes and in the lives of men and women.   With extracts from Jane Austen’s novels, letters, biographies, memoirs, and newspapers, including previously unpublished material held by The Jane Austen Society, British Library, Hampshire Record Office and Kent County Archives, this book provides an in-depth look at the historical era that gave birth to such classics as Pride and Prejudice and Emma.
    Show book
  • Selected Letters 1940–1977 - cover

    Selected Letters 1940–1977

    Vladimir Nabokov

    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
    “Wonderful, compulsively readable, delicious” personal correspondences, spanning decades in the life and literary career of the author of Lolita (The Washington Post Book World).   An icon of twentieth-century literature, Vladimir Nabokov was a novelist, poet, and playwright, whose personal life was a fascinating story in itself. This collection of more than four hundred letters chronicles the author’s career, recording his struggles in the publishing world, the battles over Lolita, and his relationship with his wife, among other subjects, and gives a surprising look at the personality behind the creator of such classics as Pale Fire and Pnin.   “Dip in anywhere, and delight follows.” —John Updike
    Show book
  • The Book of Salt - A Novel - cover

    The Book of Salt - A Novel

    Monique Truong

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A novel of Paris in the 1930s from the eyes of the Vietnamese cook employed by Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, by the author of The Sweetest Fruits.Viewing his famous mesdames and their entourage from the kitchen of their rue de Fleurus home, Binh observes their domestic entanglements while seeking his own place in the world. In a mesmerizing tale of yearning and betrayal, Monique Truong explores Paris from the salons of its artists to the dark nightlife of its outsiders and exiles. She takes us back to Binh's youthful servitude in Saigon under colonial rule, to his life as a galley hand at sea, to his brief, fateful encounters in Paris with Paul Robeson and the young Ho Chi Minh.Winner of the New York Public Library Young Lions Fiction Award A Best Book of the Year: New York Times, Village Voice, Seattle Times, Miami Herald, San Jose Mercury News, and others“An irresistible, scrupulously engineered confection that weaves together history, art, and human nature…a veritable feast.”—Los Angeles Times  “A debut novel of pungent sensuousness and intricate, inspired imagination…a marvelous tale.”—Elle“Addictive…Deliciously written…Both eloquent and original.”—Entertainment Weekly“A mesmerizing narrative voice, an insider's view of a fabled literary household and the slow revelation of heartbreaking secrets contribute to the visceral impact of this first novel.”—Publishers Weekly, starred review
    Show book
  • From the Marne to Verdun - The War Diary of Captain Charles Delvert 101st Infantry 1914–1916 - cover

    From the Marne to Verdun - The...

    Charles Delvert

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Charles Delverts diary records his career as a front-line officer in the French army fighting the Germans during the First World War. It is one of the classic accounts of the war in French or indeed in any other language, and it has not been translated into English before. In precise, graphic detail he sets down his wartime experiences and those of his men. He describes the relentless emotional and physical strain of active service and the extraordinary courage and endurance required in battle. His account is essential reading for anyone who is keen to gain a direct insight into the Great War from the French soldier's point of view, and it bears comparison with the best-known English and German memoirs and journals of the Great War.
    Show book
  • Vulcan Test Pilot - My Experiences in the Cockpit of a Cold War Icon - cover

    Vulcan Test Pilot - My...

    Tony Blackman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In this memoir, the author of Nimrod: Rise and Fall details his experience testing the UK’s strategic bomber while flying for Avro during the Cold War. In 2007, a restored Avro Vulcan Mark 2—XH558—took to the skies to help commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Falklands conflict. To coincide with this, the memoirs of one of its test pilots, Tony Blackman, was published to great acclaim. Tony flew no less than 105 of the 136 built, logging 850 flights at over 1,327 hours. His book describes in layman’s terms what it was like to tame the first prototypes of the monumental delta-wing aircraft and to master the unusual characteristics necessitated by the Vulcan’s shape. Although Tony puts the developments, demonstrations, incidents, and accidents in their political and historical context, his story is a highly personal one. He explains how this awesome aircraft became a national treasure and captured the imagination of the whole country. His words, descriptions, and photographs will make people feel as he did the excitement of handling such an incredibly powerful monster always in the knowledge that he had to be always in complete control of the monster as it could, and did, bite back.Praise for Vulcan Test Pilot“Highly readable, keeping both the technical reader interested without perplexing the layman. A fine book for both.” —Logbook “Fascinating, gracefully written, and superbly knowledgeable.” —Air and Space Magazine
    Show book
  • On Consolation - Finding Solace in Dark Times - cover

    On Consolation - Finding Solace...

    Michael Ignatieff

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Timely and profound meditations on how great figures in history, literature, music, and art searched for solace while facing tragedies and crises, from the internationally renowned historian of ideas and Booker Prize finalist Michael Ignatieff.When we lose someone we love, when we suffer loss or defeat, when catastrophe strikes—war, famine, pandemic—we go in search of consolation. Once the province of priests and philosophers, the language of consolation has largely vanished from our modern vocabulary, and the places where it was offered, houses of religion, are often empty. Rejecting the solace of ancient religious texts, humanity since the sixteenth century has increasingly placed its faith in science, ideology, and the therapeutic.How do we console each other and ourselves in an age of unbelief? In a series of lapidary meditations on writers, artists, musicians, and their works—from the books of Job and Psalms to Albert Camus, Anna Akhmatova, and Primo Levi—esteemed writer and historian Michael Ignatieff shows how men and women in extremity have looked to each other across time to recover hope and resilience. Recreating the moments when great figures found the courage to confront their fate and the determination to continue unafraid, On Consolation takes those stories into the present, movingly contending that we can revive these traditions of consolation to meet the anguish and uncertainties of our precarious twenty-first century.A Macmillan Audio production from Metropolitan Books
    Show book