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Outsmarted - Mystery of Keyser Ridge - cover

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Outsmarted - Mystery of Keyser Ridge

Chrysta Mane

Publisher: Chrysta Mane

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Summary

An unexplained dead body on pack land with no immediate apparent cause of death? Oh yeah, that's not good. Even worse, Harrison's twin brother stumbles on it while on morning patrol of pack land perimeter. Leo is slated to become pack Alpha when their father retires or dies whichever comes first. Patrolling like a commoner or finding an unidentified dead body does not make him happy. Harrison, on the other hand, thinks in more rational, logical terms. After directing his brother to wrap up the body and transport it to a remote cabin near the border of their land, thereby out of reach and prying eyes, he calmly goes about finding someone whose specialty is identifying dead bodies. Once identified and a cause of death determined, he'll contact the local Sheriff to come take possession of it. Problem solved. 
S.M. Tucker responds to his email. No-nonsense Samantha Tucker loves facts almost as much as she loves deciphering unexplained dead bodies, with flesh or reduced to skeletal remains, and is nothing like what Harrison Ripley pictured.  Moments after first meeting, , his inner puma scratches, claws, and growls to get out, hungry to mate with the curvy, bubbly, yet highly cerebral human female. Only Harrison can't get beyond the fact the female has three degrees - in forensic pathology, forensic toxicology, & forensic anthropology. His manly ego can't handle it, nor can it accept the fact Fate thought this was the perfect mate for him. Yes, he loved numbers. Heck, he had an incomparable knack and memory for them. But he'd always thought his forever mate would be a placid, easy-going shifter female, not some over-educated human who got a thrill from investigating dead bodies. This female aroused an uncomfortable feeling of being insufficient and he didn't like it one bit. Yet, her mere presence turned him on like never before. Can he push aside feeling inadequate and try to win over the fiercely independent female? Can Sam be convinced to reshuffle a packed life of teaching and working cases to make room for love and a mate? Priorities need to be rearranged if this is to work. Will both of them make the effort or risk losing the love of a lifetime?

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