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Reading the Heart - Books by Christie Leigh Babirad Companion Journal - cover

Reading the Heart - Books by Christie Leigh Babirad Companion Journal

Christie Leigh Babirad

Publisher: TouchPoint Press

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Summary

We all have a story.
 
This is a journal for you to write down all that matters to you. My hope is that through the quotes taken from my books and the short prompts, you will see all the beauty, triumph, love, and uniqueness you hold and may be inspired to uncover and pursue endeavors and treasures that may have been hidden in your heart.
 
The world needs your story. The world needs you.
 
I believe all our stories matter, and I believe that a key way to find the story is to ask yourself specific questions. My hope is that this journal will be filled with your stories. Introducing each section, you will read quotes from my books, but that’s where my input ends and yours begins. You’ll get to know my stories a little bit in this journal, but these pages aren’t about me. They’re about YOU!
 
This book is your creative space.

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