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Digital Teaching and Learning: Perspectives for English Language Education - cover

Digital Teaching and Learning: Perspectives for English Language Education

Christiane Lütge, Thorsten Merse

Publisher: Narr Francke Attempto Verlag

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Summary

The ongoing digitalization of social environments and personal lifeworlds has made it crucial to pinpoint the possibilities of digital teaching and learning also in the context of English language education. This book offers university students, trainee teachers, in-service teachers and teacher educators an in-depth exploration of the intricate relationship between English language education and digital teaching and learning. Located at the intersection of research, theory and teaching practice, it thoroughly legitimizes the use of digital media in English language education and provides concrete scenarios for their competence-oriented and task-based classroom use.

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