Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
10 for 10 - Hedley Verity and the Story of Cricket’s Greatest Bowling Feat - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 500,000 other books you can enjoy!

10 for 10 - Hedley Verity and the Story of Cricket’s Greatest Bowling Feat

Chris Waters

Publisher: Wisden

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

Hedley Verity was one of Yorkshire and England's greatest cricketers. In a career that ran from 1930 to 1939, the left-arm spin bowler took 1,956 wickets at an average of 14.90. Verity was chiefly responsible for England's only Ashes victory at Lord's in the 20th century, when his 15 wickets helped to win the 1934 Test - 14 of them captured in a single day. And he dismissed the legendary Australian batsman Don Bradman more times than anyone in Test cricket, claiming his wicket on eight occasions - and a record-equalling 10 times in first class cricket. But the high-water mark of Verity's career came during a long-forgotten County Championship match in 1932. On the Headingley ground near his birthplace, Verity returned staggering figures of 10 for 10 against Nottinghamshire - a world record that still stands. 
 
Now, for the first time, the story of this amazing game has been told as Chris Waters narrates it in relation to Verity's career - a career that ended with the outbreak of a war in which Verity was tragically killed at the age of 38. 
 
Warm and wistful, charming and colourful, 10 for 10: Hedley Verity and the story of cricket's greatest bowling feathonours the history of our summer sport.
Available since: 06/05/2015.
Print length: 160 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Buy A Game - Dre Baldwin's Early Basketball Story - cover

    Buy A Game - Dre Baldwin's Early...

    Dre Baldwin

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    I have had the idea of writing a book for a while now, and the beauty of the Internet is that anyone can put their work out there - websites, workout videos, books - freely without having to navigate through the traditional gatekeepers of self-expression. The most important part of putting this out is your response; I know I can get a lot better at this writing thing, and your critiques will be my first step in doing so. What you are about to hear is my story as a basketball player - only as it pertains to basketball - from the time I began playing the game up to and through my college years. It is to be hoped that you find it interesting, insightful, descriptive, and entertaining. If so, you should tell me. If you don't, I want to know about that too, and why. Speak your mind. Enjoy. #WOYG 
    Show book
  • Girl Hunter - Revolutionizing the Way We Eat One Hunt at a Time - cover

    Girl Hunter - Revolutionizing...

    Georgia Pellegrini

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    What happens when a classically-trained New York chef and fearless omnivore heads out of the city and into the wild to track down the ingredients for her meals? After abandoning Wall Street to embrace her lifelong love of cooking, Georgia Pellegrini comes face to face with her first kill. From honoring that first turkey to realizing that the only way we truly know where our meat comes from is if we hunt it ourselves, Pellegrini embarks on a wild ride into the real world of local, organic, and sustainable food. 
    Teaming up with veteran hunters, she trav-els over field and stream in search of the main course—from quail to venison and wild boar, from elk to javelina and squirrel. Pellegrini's road trip careens from the back of an ATV chasing wild hogs along the banks of the Mississippi to a dove hunt with beer and barbeque, to the birthplace of the Delta Blues. Along the way, she meets an array of unexpected characters—from the Commish, a venerated lifelong hunter, to the lawyer by day, duck-hunting Bayou philosopher at dawn—who offer surprising lessons about food and life. Pellegrini also discovers the dangerous underbelly of hunting when an outing turns illegal—and dangerous. 
    More than a food-laden hunting narrative, Girl Hunter also teaches you how to be a self-sufficient eater. Each chapter offers recipes for finger-licking dishes like:    wild turkey and oyster stew    stuffed quail    pheasant tagine    venison sausage    fundamental stocks, brines, sauces, and rubs    suggestions for interchanging proteins within each recipe 
    Each dish, like each story, is an adventure from begin-ning to end. 
    An inspiring, illuminating, and often funny jour-ney into unexplored territories of haute cuisine, Girl Hunter captures the joy of rolling up your sleeves and getting to the heart of where the food you eat comes from.
    Show book
  • Wrigley Field - The Long Life and Contentious Times of the Friendly Confines - cover

    Wrigley Field - The Long Life...

    Stuart Shea

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “One of the best books ever written about the Cubs, their home and the fans who flock there to watch them, win or lose.”—Rolling Stone   In spring 1914, a new ballpark opened in Chicago. Hastily constructed after epic political maneuvering around the city’s and organized baseball’s hierarchies, the new Weeghman Park (named after its builder, fast-food magnate Charley Weeghman) was home to the Federal Leagues Chicago Whales. The park would soon be known as Wrigley Field, one of the most emblematic and controversial baseball stadiums in America.   In this book, Stuart Shea provides a detailed and colorful chronicle of this living historic landmark and shows how the stadium has evolved to meet the shifting priorities of its owners and changing demands of its fans. While Wrigley Field today seems irreplaceable, we learn that from game one it has been the subject of endless debates over its future, its design, and its place in the neighborhood it calls home. To some, it is a hallowed piece of baseball history; to others, an icon of mismanagement and ineptitude. Shea deftly navigates the highs and lows, breaking through myths and rumors, in a book packed with facts, stories, and surprises that will captivate even the most fair-weather fan. From big money (the Ricketts family paid $900 million for the team and stadium in 2009), to exploding hot dog carts, to the curse-inducing goat, Shea uncovers the heart of the stadium’s history.   “More than any other American institution, baseball most wholeheartedly welcomes half-baked history and curdled lore. It's fun, after all; what grinch wishes to poke at the tale of Babe Ruth's called shot? But more often than not the real stories are even more delicious, and no one has gathered more of them than author Stuart Shea. His book is an unceasing delight.”—John Thorn, official historian, Major League Baseball and author of Baseball in the Garden of Eden
    Show book
  • Black Ice - The Val James Story - cover

    Black Ice - The Val James Story

    Valmore James, John Gallagher

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Val James became the first African American player in the NHL when he took to the ice with the Buffalo Sabres in 1982, and in 1987 he became the first black player of any nationality to skate for the Toronto Maple Leafs. 
    Born in central Florida, James grew up on Long Island and received his first pair of skates for his 13th birthday. At 16, James left home to play in Canada, where he was the only black person in junior and, often, in the whole town. While popular for his tough play and winning personality, the teenager faced racist taunts at opposing arenas, and the prejudice continued at all levels of the game. In his two NHL stints, James defined himself as a smart team player and opponent, known for his pugilistic skills. 
    Black Ice is the untold story of a trail-blazing athlete who endured and overcame discrimination to realize his dreams and become an inspiration for future generations.
    Show book
  • Shattered - Struck Down but Not Destroyed - cover

    Shattered - Struck Down but Not...

    Frank Pastore, Ellen Vaughn

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Cincinnati Reds pitcher Frank Pastore stepped onto the mound in Dodger Stadium to throw another fastball-something he'd done thousands of times since childhood. But this time was different. The batter connected and the ball came rocketing back to the mound, shattering not only Frank's pitching elbow-but also his dream of getting "rich and famous" through Major League Baseball.™ As he walked to the training room, Frank found himself asking a God he didn't believe in, "Why is this happening to me?" There was no answer-at least not then. It was this injury that sent Frank, a lifelong atheist, on a journey that would change not only his mind but also his whole life-as a husband, father, friend, and troubled son. We all know the pain of shattered dreams. We've all wondered how to pick up the broken pieces after a crisis. We've all wondered, "Where is God?" when life hurts so bad. This is a story of how the fragments of broken dreams can be reassembled into even bigger and better things. A story of how, when life's disasters and difficulties knock us down, they don't have to destroy us. This is a story that shows how all of us can come to know we're in God's good hands. Even when we're shattered.
    Show book
  • The Devil's Snake Curve - A Fan's Notes from Left Field - cover

    The Devil's Snake Curve - A...

    Josh Ostergaard

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “A unique baseball book, one that cleverly explores the history of the sport through cultural and political lenses.” —Largehearted Boy  The Devil’s Snake Curve offers an alternative American history, in which colonialism, jingoism, capitalism, and faith are represented by baseball. Personal and political, it twines Japanese internment camps with the Yankees; Walmart with the Kansas City Royals; and facial hair patterns with militarism, Guantanamo, and the modern security state. An essay, a miscellany, and a passionate unsettling of Josh Ostergaard’s relationship with our national pastime, it allows for both the clover of a childhood outfield and the persistence of the game’s service to those in power. America and baseball are both hard to love or leave in this, by turns coruscating and heartfelt, debut.   “The Devil’s Snake Curve will receive a particularly warm welcome from those who love the game but resist easy analogies comparing its slow, idiosyncratic progress to the slow idiosyncratic progress of the American experiment. Its young author, Josh Ostergaard, emerges from an ironic generation that tends to regard hero worship as faintly ridiculous, meaning that individual legends from any given era are less interesting to him than whatever social, cultural, or political forces might have combined to prop those legends up.”—New York Times   “Expansive and inventive . . . A challenging reconsideration of a game that used to be called the national pastime.” —Star Tribune   “One of the most fascinating books ever written about baseball.” —The Cultural Weekly
    Show book