Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
The Reason I Run - How Two Men Transformed Tragedy into the Greatest Race of Their Lives - cover

The Reason I Run - How Two Men Transformed Tragedy into the Greatest Race of Their Lives

Chris Spriggs

Publisher: Summersdale

  • 1
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

How do people come together when tragedy tries to tear them apart? 
 
When 39-time marathon runner Andrew Spriggs was diagnosed with motor neurone disease he knew his running days were over. But a surprise message from his nephew Chris, offering to push him in his rickety wheelchair in one last marathon, reunites them in a race against time.
 
Rich with insights and inspiration, personal discoveries and unforgettable encounters, 'The Reason I Run' is an astonishing story that will make you laugh, weep and wonder. Join Chris on an incredible journey that will stay with you for the rest of your life.

Other books that might interest you

  • Memory Is Our Home - Loss and Remembering: Three Generations in Poland and Russia 1917-1960s - cover

    Memory Is Our Home - Loss and...

    Suzanna Eibuszyc

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Memory Is Our Home is a powerful biographical memoir based on the diaries of Roma Talasiewicz-Eibuszyc, who was born in Warsaw before the end of World War I, grew up during the interwar period and who, after escaping the atrocities of World War II, was able to survive in the vast territories of Soviet Russia and Uzbekistan. 
    Translated by her own daughter, interweaving her own recollections as her family made a new life in the shadows of the Holocaust in Communist Poland after the war and into the late 1960s, this book is a rich, living document, a riveting account of a vibrant young woman's courage and endurance. 
    A forty-year recollection of love and loss, of hopes and dreams for a better world, it provides richly-textured accounts of the physical and emotional lives of Jews in Warsaw and of survival during World War II throughout Russia. This book, narrated in a compelling, unique voice through two generations, is the proverbial candle needed to keep memory alive.
    Show book
  • Field Notes from Elsewhere - Reflections on Dying and Living - cover

    Field Notes from Elsewhere -...

    Mark Taylor

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    In the fall of 2005, Mark C. Taylor, the controversial public intellectual and widely respected scholar, suddenly fell critically ill. For two days a team of forty doctors, many of whom thought he would not live, fought to save him. Taylor would eventually recover, but only to face a new threat: surgery for cancer. "These experiences have changed me in ways I am still struggling to understand," Taylor writes in this absorbing memoir. "After the past year, I am persuaded that I have done enough fieldwork to write a book that combines philosophical and theological reflection with autobiographical narrative. Writing is not only possible but actually seems necessary." 
    Field Notes from Elsewhere is Taylor's unforgettable, inverted journey from death to life. Each of his memoir's fifty-two chapters and accompanying photographs recounts a morning-to-evening experience with sickness and convalescence, mingling humor and hope with a deep exploration of human frailty and, conversely, resilience. When we confront the end of life, Taylor explains, the axis of the lived world shifts, and everything must be reevaluated. As Taylor sorts through his remembrances, much that once seemed familiar becomes strange, paradoxical, and contradictory. He reads his experience with and against ghosts from his past, recasting the meaning of mortality, sacrifice, solitude, and abandonment, along with a host of other issues, in light of modern ways of dying. "You never come back from elsewhere," Taylor concludes, "because elsewhere always comes back with you."
    Show book
  • Eat the Apple - cover

    Eat the Apple

    Matt Young

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    "The Iliad of the Iraq war" (Tim Weiner)--a gut-wrenching, beautiful memoir of the consequences of war on the psyche of a young man.  
     
    Eat the Apple is a daring, twisted, and darkly hilarious story of American youth and masculinity in an age of continuous war. Matt Young joined the Marine Corps at age eighteen after a drunken night culminating in wrapping his car around a fire hydrant. The teenage wasteland he fled followed him to the training bases charged with making him a Marine. Matt survived the training and then not one, not two, but three deployments to Iraq, where the testosterone, danger, and stakes for him and his fellow grunts were dialed up a dozen decibels.  
     
    With its kaleidoscopic array of literary forms, from interior dialogues to infographics to prose passages that read like poetry, Young's narrative powerfully mirrors the multifaceted nature of his experience. Visceral, ironic, self-lacerating, and ultimately redemptive, Young's story drops us unarmed into Marine Corps culture and lays bare the absurdism of 21st-century war, the manned-up vulnerability of those on the front lines, and the true, if often misguided, motivations that drove a young man to a life at war.  
     
    Searing in its honesty, tender in its vulnerability, and brilliantly written, Eat the Apple is a modern war classic in the making and a powerful coming-of-age story that maps the insane geography of our times.
    Show book
  • The Loss of a Life Partner - Narratives of the Bereaved - cover

    The Loss of a Life Partner -...

    Carolyn Ambler Walter

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Although there is extensive research on the loss of a spouse, predominantly focusing on the experiences of widows, much less attention is paid to bereaved partners not married to their significant other, whether or not the partners are of the same sex. This first-of-its-kind work explores both socially sanctioned and disenfranchised grief, highlighting similarities and differences. Combining a discussion of various theories of grief with personal narratives of grieving men and women drawn from numerous interviews, and detailed case study analysis, Carolyn Ambler Walter has produced a penetrating examination of the bereavement experiences of partners in varying types of relationships. She views narratives of widows, widowers, and bereaved domestic gay and lesbian partners from a postmodern perspective that breaks away from the traditional belief that the living must detach themselves from the dead in order to move on with their lives. Instead, building on the works of postmodern grief theorists such as Klass, Silverman, and Nickman, Walter views ongoing bonds with the dead as a resource for enriching functionality in the present, and as a key to looking to the future.
    Show book
  • The Blessing - A Memoir - cover

    The Blessing - A Memoir

    Gregory Orr

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Author is one of the United States’ major sources for cultural contextualization around gun violence and youth trauma; most recently, PBS featured Orr in response to a 2014 accidental shooting by a nine-year-old girl 
    Author is one of the United States’ most celebrated and acclaimed poets 
    Readership of memoirs that explore trauma, like Alexander Chee’s How to Write an Autobiographical Novel and Kiese Laymon’s Heavy, is on the rise 
    Media coverage of how we interrogate and explore trauma is less voyeuristic than when the first edition of this memoir was published in 2002; media consumers are more interested in complex storytelling about trauma 
    New package includes timely afterword and Washington Post praise on cover
    Show book
  • Three Brothers - Memories of My Family - cover

    Three Brothers - Memories of My...

    Yan Lianke

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    From one of China’s most highly regarded writers, winner of the Franz Kafka Prize and twice finalist for the International Booker Prize, Three Brothers is a beautiful and heartwrenching memoir of the author’s childhood and family life during the Cultural Revolution  
      
    In this heartfelt, intimate memoir, Yan Lianke brings the reader into his childhood home in Song County in Henan Province, painting a vivid portrait of rural China in the 1960s and ’70s. Three Brothers is a literary testament to the great humanity and small joys that exist even in times of darkness.  
      
    With lyricism and deep emotion, Yan chronicles the extraordinary lives of his father and uncles, as well as his own. Living in a remote village, Yan’s parents are so poor that they can only afford to use wheat flour on New Year and festival days, and while Yan dreams of fried scallion buns, and even steals from his father to buy sesame seed cakes. He yearns to leave the village, however he can, and soon novels become an escape. He resolves to become a writer himself after reading on the back of a novel that its author was given leave to remain in the city of Harbin after publishing her book. In the evenings, after finishing back-breaking shifts hauling stones at a cement factory, sometimes sixteen hours long, he sets to work writing. He is ultimately delivered from the drudgery and danger of manual labor by a career in the Army, but he is filled with regrets as he recalls these years of scarcity, turmoil, and poverty.  
      
    A philosophical portrait of grief, death, home, and fate that gleams with Yan’s quick wit and gift for imagery, Three Brothers is a personal portrait of a politically devastating period, and a celebration of the power of the family to hold together even in the harshest circumstances.
    Show book