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The Reason I Run - How Two Men Transformed Tragedy into the Greatest Race of Their Lives - cover

The Reason I Run - How Two Men Transformed Tragedy into the Greatest Race of Their Lives

Chris Spriggs

Publisher: Summersdale

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Summary

How do people come together when tragedy tries to tear them apart? 
 
When 39-time marathon runner Andrew Spriggs was diagnosed with motor neurone disease he knew his running days were over. But a surprise message from his nephew Chris, offering to push him in his rickety wheelchair in one last marathon, reunites them in a race against time.
 
Rich with insights and inspiration, personal discoveries and unforgettable encounters, 'The Reason I Run' is an astonishing story that will make you laugh, weep and wonder. Join Chris on an incredible journey that will stay with you for the rest of your life.

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