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Antonio and Sabrina Struck In Love 2 - cover

Antonio and Sabrina Struck In Love 2

Chiquita Dennie

Publisher: 304 Publishing Company

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Summary

Sabrina Washington has worked hard to get what she wants in life. The last thing the sassy, headstrong VP executive wants is an Alpha male who breaks all the rules, but when she meets Antonio De Luca, her steely façade starts to crumble under his gaze. He's exactly the kind of man who can unravel her straight-shooting reputation and she's not so convinced that's a bad thing.  As they grow closer, her ability to resist her desires begins to waver. Soon, she finds herself immersed in his sexy and dangerous world and she's not sure she wants to go back to her old life...

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