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Josiah's Fire - Autism Stole His Words God Gave Him a Voice - cover

Josiah's Fire - Autism Stole His Words God Gave Him a Voice

Cheryl Ricker, Tahni Cullen

Publisher: BroadStreet Publishing Group, LLC

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Summary

Where is hope when there is no hope?


 


First-time parents Joe and Tahni Cullen were thrust into the confusing world of autism when their toddler, Josiah, suddenly lost his ability to speak, play, and socialize. The diagnosis: Autism Spectrum Disorder. In their attempts to see Josiah recover and regain speech, the Cullens underwent overwhelming physical, emotional, and financial struggles. While other kids around him improved, Josiah only got worse.


Five years later, Josiah, who had not been formally taught to read or write, suddenly began to type on his iPad profound paragraphs about God, science, history, business, music, strangers, and heaven. Josiah's eye-opening visions, heavenly encounters, and supernatural experiences forced his family out of their comfort zone and predictable theology, catapulting them into a mind-blowing love-encounter with Jesus.

- Find hope in hardship.
- Catch a fresh glimpse of heaven.
- Learn to hear and trust God's voice.
- Identify the roles of Father, Son, and Spirit.
- Be aware of the workings of angels, and much more! Follow a trail of truth into Josiah's mysterious world, and see why his family and friends can no longer stay silent.
Available since: 09/01/2016.
Print length: 256 pages.

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