Do you want to read 1 year without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Legends of the Outer Banks and Tar Heel Tide Waters - cover

Legends of the Outer Banks and Tar Heel Tide Waters

Charles Harry Whedbee

Publisher: Blair

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

From Blackbeard's den at Ocracoke, to the Hills of the Seven Sisters at Nags Head, to the misty swamps of Shallote, there is hardly an inch of territory along North Carolina's coast without a legend attached to it. Inlanders may be skeptical regarding the sometimes miraculous, often horror-filled tales that make up coastal folklore, but Outer Bankers accept the incredible as fact. But this book is more than a collection of coastal legends. It is an affectionate portrait of the people who daily pull a living out of the treacherous waters of the Atlantic . . . a tribute to the hardiness and courage that have made the Banker a rare breed . . . a breed whose true stories are, indeed, stranger than fiction.

Who read this book also read:

  • The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy - One Book to Rule Them All - cover

    The Lord of the Rings and...

    Eric Bronson, Gregory Bassham

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Lord of the Rings is intended to be applicable to the real world of relationships, religion, pleasure, pain, and politics. Tolkien himself said that his grand tale of wizards, orcs, hobbits, and elves was aimed at truth and good morals in the actual world.Analysis of the popular appeal of The Lord of the Rings (on websites and elsewhere) shows that Tolkien fans are hungry for discussion of the urgent moral and cosmological issues arising out of this fantastic epic story.Can political power be wielded for good, or must it always corrupt? Does technology destroy the truly human? Is it morally wrong to give up hope? Can we find meaning in chance events?In The Lord of the Rings and Philosophy, seventeen young philosophy professors, all of them ardent Tolkien fans and most of them contributors to the four earlier volumes in the Popular Culture and Philosophy series, address some of these important issues and show how clues to their solutions may be found in the imaginary world of Middle-earth. The book is divided into five sections, concerned with Power and the Ring, the Quest for Happiness, Good and Evil in Middle-earth, Time and Mortality, and the Relevance
    Show book
  • The Best American Magazine Writing 2017 - cover

    The Best American Magazine...

    The American Society of Magazine...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    With the work of journalists under fire around the world, this year’s anthology of National Magazine Awards finalists and winners is a timely reminder of the power of journalism. These pieces from writers driven to explore America’s fault lines include Shane Bauer’s harrowing “My Four Months as a Private Prison Guard” (Mother Jones), a visceral portrait of the abuses of the carceral system, and Sarah Stillman’s account of the havoc wreaked on young people’s lives when they are put on sex-offender registries (The New Yorker). In two different considerations of parenting, Nikole Hannah-Jones looks for a school for her daughter in a rapidly changing, racially divided Brooklyn (New York Times Magazine) and Michael Chabon takes his thirteen-year-old son to Fashion Week in Paris (GQ). Pamela Colloff explores how the 1966 University  of Texas Tower mass shooting changed the course of one survivor’s life (Texas Monthly), and Siddhartha Mukherjee depicts the art and agony of oncology (New York Times Magazine).Other selections take up the shocks of the election, including Matt Taibbi’s irreverent dispatches from the campaign trail (Rolling Stone) and George Saunders’s transfixing account of Trump’s rallies (The New Yorker). Jeffrey Goldberg talks through Obama’s foreign-policy legacy with the president (The Atlantic), Andrew Sullivan fears for the future of democracy (New York), and Gabriel Sherman relates how the women of Fox News brought to light Roger Ailes’s predations (New York). Joining them are Rebecca Solnit’s wide-ranging Harper’s commentary, Becca Rothfeld’s pondering women waiting from The Odyssey to Tinder (Hedgehog Review), and bold expeditions into nature: David Quammen ventures to Yellowstone to consider the future of wild places (National Geographic), and Mac McClelland sets off for Cuba in search of the ivory-billed woodpecker (Audubon).
    Show book
  • Sex with the Queen - 900 Years of Vile Kings Virile Lovers and Passionate Politics - cover

    Sex with the Queen - 900 Years...

    Eleanor Herman

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    In this follow-up to her bestselling Sex with Kings, Eleanor Herman reveals the truth about what goes on behind the closed door of a queen's boudoir. Impeccably researched, filled with page-turning romance, passion, and scandal, Sex with the Queen explores the scintillating sexual lives of some of our most beloved and infamous female rulers. 
    She was the queen, living in an opulent palace, wearing lavish gowns and dazzling jewels. She was envied, admired, and revered. She was also miserable, having been forced to marry a foreign prince sight unseen, a royal ogre who was sadistic, foaming at the mouth, physically repulsive, mentally incompetent, or sexually impotent—and in some cases all of the above. 
    How did queens find happiness? In courts bristling with testosterone—swashbuckling generals, polished courtiers, and virile cardinals—many royal women had love affairs. 
    Anne Boleyn flirted with courtiers; Catherine Howard slept with one. Henry VIII had both of them beheaded. 
    Catherine the Great had her idiot husband murdered, and ruled the Russian empire with a long list of sexy young favorites. 
    Marie Antoinette fell in love with the handsome Swedish count Axel Fersen, who tried valiantly to rescue her from the guillotine. 
    Empress Alexandra of Russia found emotional solace in the mad monk Rasputin. Her behavior was the spark that set off the firestorm of the Russian revolution. 
    Princess Diana gave up her palace bodyguard to enjoy countless love affairs, which tragically led to her early death. 
    When a queen became sick to death of her husband and took a lover, anything could happen—from disgrace and death to political victory. Some kings imprisoned erring wives for life; other monarchs obligingly named the queen's lover prime minister. 
    The crucial factor deciding the fate of an unfaithful queen was the love affair's implications in terms of power, money, and factional rivalry. At European courts, it was the politics—not the sex—that caused a royal woman's tragedy—or her ultimate triumph.
    Show book
  • How I Met Your Mother and Philosophy - cover

    How I Met Your Mother and...

    Lorenzo von Matterhorn

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Like philosophy itself, How I Met Your Mother has everyone thinking. How does a successful show that's been on the air for years suddenly become a hit in its fifth and sixth season? Have you ever wondered why you identify so strongly with Barney despite the fact that he’s such a douche?  Or why your life story doesn’t make sense until you know the ending—or at least, the middle?  Or where the Bro Code came from and why it’s so powerful?  Or why you’d sooner miss the hottest date in your life than have to live in New Jersey?  Of course you have, or if you haven’t, you’ll clearly remember from now on that you have.  How I Met Your Mother and Philosophy answers all these questions and a whole lot more, including one or two that even you may not have thought of.  Twenty of the awesome-est philosophers ever congregated in one bar have come together to quaff a few drinks—and to analyze this most awesomely philosophical of sit-coms. They poke, prod, and sniff at such momentous matters as the metaphysics of possimpible worlds, the misdeeds of Goliath National Bank, the ontology of waiting to get slapped, the epistemology of sexual attraction, why the Platinum Rule is to never love thy neighbor, the authenticity of censoring yourself, the ethics of doing bad things with partly good intentions, why future Ted’s opinions matter to present-day Ted, whether it’s irrational to wait for the Slutty Pumpkin, and why Canadians have that strange Canadian slant on things.     This book shows that viewers of How I Met Your Mother and Philosophy know that philosophy is much more than a song and dance routine.
    Show book
  • My Experiments with Truth - An Autobiography - cover

    My Experiments with Truth - An...

    Mahatma Gandhi

    • 1
    • 10
    • 0
    The Story of My Experiments with Truth, the autobiography of Mahatma Gandhi, is a very popular and influential book. It covers the period from his birth (1869) to the year 1921, describing his childhood, his school days, his early marriage, his journeys abroad, his legal studies and practise.
    The book is more about the experiments of Gandhi with truth and his Satyagraha movement, which literally means demanding the truth and nothing else. This is the very idea that helped him to fight against racism, violence and colonialism. All of this eventually helped him to achieve his dream of an independent India.
    Gandhi mentions his numerous experiments, starting from his elocution training to putting an end to his fear and shyness towards public speaking. His instances of attending singing classes and shaking a leg on the dance floor are well-described. He was a staunch vegetarian, fasted regularly and walked 10 miles daily. He studied comparative religion greatly and was a devote Hindu, but showed great respect for all religions. Gandhi didn't shy away from accepting his own mistakes and displayed commendable patience and fortitude in his personal life. 
    About the Author:
    Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, was the prominent figure in the freedom struggle in India from the British rule. He is also known as the 'The Father of the Nation', in India.
    The author has written a number of books and some of them include Character & Nation Building, India of My Dreams, and All Men are Brothers.
    The author was born on the 2nd of October, 1869, in Porbandar, Gujarat. In the year 1942, he played a key role in launching the Quit India movement, which was intended at forcing the British to leave the nation. As a result of launching this movement, he was thrown in prison and remained there for several years, due to other political offenses allegedly committed by him. At all times, he practised satyagraha, which is the teaching of non-violence. As the British rule ended, he was saddened by India's partition, and tried his best to bring peace among the Sikhs and Muslims. On the 30th of January, 1948, Mahatma Gandhi was shot dead by a Hindu nationalist, for allegedly being highly concerned about the nation's Muslim population.
    Show book
  • Voyages - From Tongan Villages to American Suburbs Second Edition - cover

    Voyages - From Tongan Villages...

    Cathy A. Small

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In Voyages, Cathy A. Small offers a view of the changes in migration, globalization, and ethnographic fieldwork over three decades. The second edition adds fresh descriptions and narratives in three new chapters based on two more visits to Tonga and California in 2010. The author (whose role after thirty years of fieldwork is both ethnographer and family member) reintroduces the reader to four sisters in the same family-two who migrated to the United States and two who remained in Tonga-and reveals what has unfolded in their lives in the fifteen years since the first edition was written. The second edition concludes with new reflections on how immigration and globalization have affected family, economy, tradition, political life, identity, and the practice of anthropology.
    Show book