Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Major Works of Charles Dickens: Great Expectations; Hard Times; Oliver Twist; A Christmas Carol; Bleak House; A Tale of Two Cities - cover

Major Works of Charles Dickens: Great Expectations; Hard Times; Oliver Twist; A Christmas Carol; Bleak House; A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens

Publisher: LBA

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

CONTENTS:1. A TALE OF TWO CITIES2. DAVID COPPERFIELD3. GREAT EXPECTATIONS4. OLIVER TWIST

Other books that might interest you

  • May We Borrow Your Husband? - & Other Comedies of the Sexual Life - cover

    May We Borrow Your Husband? - &...

    Graham Greene

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A collection of twelve disarmingly witty tales about the complexities of love and intimacy from “a storyteller of genius” (Evelyn Waugh).    “The sense of the author at play dominates” Graham Greene’s entertaining anthology as the masterful British author looks at love, lies, vanity, mortality, romantic obsessions, and seduction from a dozen sharply observed perspectives (The New York Times).   A bored faculty wife looking for a fling discovers something more illuminating than sex; a jaded writer who eavesdrops on a pair of hopeful lovers feels compelled to relieve them of their foolish ideals and ambitions; a widow and a divorcée commiserate in mourning for their lost men, only to rejoice in their freedom after two bottles of blanc de blancs; a young man devises a test of true love—to find a woman who won’t laugh at the absurd circumstances of his father’s death; and in the title story, an oblivious young bride honeymooning in Antibes encourages a friendship between a gay couple and her adventurous and handsome new husband.  
    Show book
  • The Quiet American - cover

    The Quiet American

    Graham Greene

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    A “masterful . . . brilliantly constructed novel” of love and chaos in 1950s Vietnam (Zadie Smith, The Guardian).   It’s 1955 and British journalist Thomas Fowler has been in Vietnam for two years covering the insurgency against French colonial rule. But it’s not just a political tangle that’s kept him tethered to the country. There’s also his lover, Phuong, a young Vietnamese woman who clings to Fowler for protection. Then comes Alden Pyle, an idealistic American working in service of the CIA. Devotedly, disastrously patriotic, he believes neither communism nor colonialism is what’s best for Southeast Asia, but rather a “Third Force”: American democracy by any means necessary. His ideas of conquest include Phuong, to whom he promises a sweet life in the states. But as Pyle’s blind moral conviction wreaks havoc upon innocent lives, it’s ultimately his romantic compulsions that will play a role in his own undoing.   Although criticized upon publication as anti-American, Graham Greene’s “complex but compelling story of intrigue and counter-intrigue” would, in a few short years, prove prescient in its own condemnation of American interventionism (The New York Times).    
    Show book
  • The Man Within - cover

    The Man Within

    Graham Greene

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The “strikingly original” debut novel by the masterful British author is “a perfect adventure” of love and smuggling on the English coast (The Nation).   Francis Andrews is a reluctant smuggler living in the shadow of his brutish father’s legacy. To exorcise the ghosts of the man he loathes, Andrews betrays his colleagues to authorities and takes flight across the downs. It’s here that he stumbles upon the isolated cottage of a beguiling stranger named Elizabeth—an empathetic young woman who is just as lonely, every bit the outsider as he, and reconciling a troubling past of her own. Andrews, a man on the run from those he exposed, believes he’s found refuge and salvation. But when Elizabeth encourages him to return to the courts of Lewes and give evidence against his accomplices, the treacherous and deadly repercussions may be beyond their control.   “The ultimate strengths of [Graham] Greene’s books is that he shows us the hazards of compassion,” a theme that would find its earliest expression in The Man Within, his first published novel (Pico Iyer).  
    Show book
  • Women and Angels - Stories - cover

    Women and Angels - Stories

    Harold Brodkey

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    From Harold Brodkey come three remarkable stories about the brief lives of two women and the troubling appearance of an angel above Harvard UniversityConsidered by many to be among the greatest American writers of the twentieth century, Harold Brodkey created fiction that startled, provoked, and often confounded. These three novellas, told through the recollections of fictional alter ego, Wiley Silenowicz, serve as sterling examples of Brodkey’s magnificent talent. In “Ceil,” Wiley imagines the mother he never knew, brilliantly reinventing the woman who died when he was a child of two, creating a parent both idealized and painfully real. In “Lila,” Wiley remembers his adoptive mother, an unloving and unlovable, self-involved woman, whose early death from cancer left a permanent void in his family. And in “Angel,”the book’s remarkable closing piece, Wiley recalls a heavenly visitation that came to him and many others while studying at Harvard University, and which heralded a truth most difficult to bear. For lovers of literature who have yet to experience Brodkey’s unique style, soaring language, and conceptual brilliance, Women and Angels is a marvelous introduction to an American master.
    Show book
  • The Confidential Agent - cover

    The Confidential Agent

    Graham Greene

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    In Greene’s “magnificent tour-de-force among tales of international intrigue,” rival agents engage in a deadly game of cat and mouse in prewar England (The New York Times).   D., a widowed professor of Romance literature, has arrived in Dover on a peaceful yet important mission. He’s to negotiate a contract to buy coal for his country, one torn by civil war. With it, there’s a chance to defeat fascist influences. Without it, the loyalists will fail. When D. strikes up a romantic acquaintance with the estranged but solicitous daughter of a powerful coal-mining magnate, everything appears to be in his favor—if not for a counteragent who has come to England with the intent of sabotaging every move he makes. Accused of forgery and theft, and roped into a charge of murder, D. becomes a hunted man, hemmed in at every turn by an ever-tightening net of intrigue and double cross, with no one left to trust but himself.   Written during the height of the Spanish Civil War, Graham Greene’s “exciting . . . kaleidoscopic affair” was the basis for the classic 1945 thriller starring Charles Boyer and Lauren Bacall (The Sunday Times).  
    Show book
  • The Captain and the Enemy - cover

    The Captain and the Enemy

    Graham Greene

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In postwar London, a boy is drawn into a labyrinth of personal betrayals, intrigue, love, and revolution: “In short, a tremendous yarn” (Paul Theroux).   On his twelfth birthday, Victor Baxter is spirited away from boarding school by a stranger known only as the Captain who claims to have won him in a backgammon game with the boy’s diabolical father. Settling into a new life in a dire London flat, Victor becomes the willing ward of his mysterious abductor and the tender and childless Liza. He quickly adapts to the only family he’s ever known, despite the Captain’s long disappearances on suspicious “adventures” and a guarded curiosity about this peculiar but devoted couple who call him son. Then one day, in pursuit of answers, and perhaps an adventure of his own, Victor responds to an entreaty from the Captain to come to Panama. What transpires in this world of dangerous imposture is absolutely revelatory—for both Victor and the Captain.   In Graham Greene’s final novel, “we enter those disparate worlds [he] has made his own—the England of Brighton Rock and The Ministry of Fear, and the exotic Central American territories in which his restless talent has so often roamed” (The New York Times).  
    Show book