As many books as you want!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Hard Times - With Appreciations and Criticisms By G K Chesterton - cover

Hard Times - With Appreciations and Criticisms By G K Chesterton

Charles Dickens, G. K. Chesterton

Publisher: Read & Co. Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The tenth novel written by Dickens, “Hard Times” was first published in 1854. The story is set in the fictitious Victorian industrial mill-town of Coketown and examines English society while satirising the social and economic conditions of the era. Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812–1870) was an English writer and social critic famous for having created some of the world's most well-known fictional characters. His works became unprecedentedly popular during his life, and today he is commonly regarded as the greatest Victorian-era novelist. Although perhaps better known for such works as “Oliver Twist” or “A Christmas Carol”, Dickens first gained success with the 1836 serial publication of “The Pickwick Papers”, which turned him almost overnight into an international literary celebrity thanks to his humour, satire, and astute observations concerning society and character.  This classic work is being republished now in a new edition complete with an introductory chapter from “Appreciations and Criticisms of the Works of Charles Dickens” by G. K. Chesterton.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Global Bourgeoisie - The Rise of the Middle Classes in the Age of Empire - cover

    The Global Bourgeoisie - The...

    Jürgen Osterhammel, David...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The first global history of the middle class  
    While the nineteenth century has been described as the golden age of the European bourgeoisie, the emergence of the middle class and bourgeois culture was by no means exclusive to Europe. The Global Bourgeoisie explores the rise of the middle classes around the world during the age of empire. Bringing together eminent scholars, this landmark essay collection compares middle-class formation in various regions, highlighting differences and similarities, and assesses the extent to which bourgeois growth was tied to the increasing exchange of ideas and goods. The contributors indicate that the middle class was from its very beginning, even in Europe, the result of international connections and entanglements. 
    Essays are grouped into six thematic sections: the political history of middle-class formation, the impact of imperial rule on the colonial middle class, the role of capitalism, the influence of religion, the obstacles to the middle class beyond the Western and colonial world, and, lastly, reflections on the creation of bourgeois cultures and global social history. Placing the establishment of middle-class society into historical context, this book shows how the triumph or destabilization of bourgeois values can shape the liberal world order. 
    The Global Bourgeoisie irrevocably changes the understanding of how an important social class came to be.
    Show book
  • Vulnerable Witness - The Politics of Grief in the Field - cover

    Vulnerable Witness - The...

    Kathryn Gillespie, Patricia J....

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Scholars and practitioners who witness violence and loss in human, animal, and ecological contexts are expected to have no emotional connection to the subjects they study. Yet is this possible? Following feminist traditions, Vulnerable Witness centers the researcher and challenges readers to reflect on how grieving is part of the research process and, by extension, is a political act. Through thirteen reflective essays the book theorizes the role of grief in the doing of research—from methodological choices, fieldwork and analysis, engagement with individuals, and places of study to the manner in which scholars write and talk about their subjects. Combining personal stories from early career scholars, advocates, and senior faculty, the book shares a breadth of emotional engagement at various career stages and explores the transformative possibilities that emerge from being enmeshed with one's own research. 
    Show book
  • The Psychoid Soul and Psyche: Piercing Space-Time Barriers - cover

    The Psychoid Soul and Psyche:...

    Ann Belford Ulanov

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    This book offers a collection of many new ideas: connection with the psychoid processes of the unconscious is a source of healing, especially in relation to trauma; fresh interpretation of the bedevilling flashbacks of trauma; addition of an alternative interpenetrating matrix to the container model of healing; sum of the insights of Nicholas of Cusa and their implications for Jung’s complex around freedom and relation to the Divine.
    Show book
  • Simone de Beauvoir Philosophy and Feminism - cover

    Simone de Beauvoir Philosophy...

    Nancy Bauer

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    In the introduction to The Second Sex, Simone de Beauvoir notes that "a man never begins by establishing himself as an individual of a certain sex: his being a man poses no problem." Nancy Bauer begins her book by asking: "Then what kind of a problem does being a woman pose?" Bauer's aim is to show that in answering this question The Second Sex dramatizes the extent to which being a woman poses a philosophical problem. This book is a call for philosophers as well as feminists to turn, or return to, The Second Sex. Bauer shows that Beauvoir's magnum opus, written a quarter-century before the development of contemporary feminist philosophy, constitutes a meditation on the relationship between women and philosophy that remains profoundly undervalued. She argues that the extraordinary effect The Second Sex has had on women's lives, then and now, can be traced to Beauvoir's discovery of a new way to philosophize—a way grounded in her identity as a woman. In offering a new interpretation of The Second Sex, Bauer shows how philosophy can be politically productive for women while remaining genuinely philosophical.
    Show book
  • Lost in the City - cover

    Lost in the City

    Edward P. Jones

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “Original and arresting….[Jones’s] stories will touch chords of empathy and recognition in all readers.”—Washington Post 
     “These 14 stories of African-American life…affirm humanity as only good literature can.” —Los Angeles Times 
    A magnificent collection of short fiction focusing on the lives of African-American men and women in Washington, D.C., Lost in the City is the book that first brought author Edward P. Jones to national attention. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and numerous other honors for his novel The Known World, Jones made his literary debut with these powerful tales of ordinary people who live in the shadows in this metropolis of great monuments and rich history. Lost in the City received the Pen/Hemingway Award for Best First Fiction and was a National Book Award Finalist. This beautiful 20th Anniversary Edition features a new introduction by the author, and is a wonderful companion piece to Jones’s masterful novel and his second acclaimed collection of stories, All Aunt Hagar’s Children.
    Show book
  • The Wisdom of George Santayana - cover

    The Wisdom of George Santayana

    Philosophical Library

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
     A survey of the influential—and prolific—modern philosopher In dozens of books, magazine articles, and essays, George Santayana infused his philosophy with exquisite language, wit, and subtle humor, prompting one authority to state that he “writes philosophy more beautifully than any other thinker since Plato.” The Wisdom of George Santayana makes accessible both his ideas and his oft-quoted aphorisms on a variety of subjects including naturalism, creative imagination, and spirituality without dogma. Organized by books and essays, and highlighting key words and themes, this compilation is an excellent introduction to the man and his work. 
     
    Show book