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Every Girl's Library - 50 Classics in One Volume - The Greatest Novels & Stories for Young Women Including the Biographies of the Most Famous Defiant and Influential Women in History - cover

Every Girl's Library - 50 Classics in One Volume - The Greatest Novels & Stories for Young Women Including the Biographies of the Most Famous Defiant and Influential Women in History

Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, Mark Twain, Luisa May Alcott, Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, L. Frank Baum, Hans Christian Andersen, Jean Webster, Eleanor H. Porter, George MacDonald, E. Nesbit, Johanna Spyri, Robert Louis Stevenson, Kate Douglas Wiggin, Gene Stratton-Porter, Mary Mapes Dodge, L. T. Meade, Susan Coolidge, Martha Finley, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Susan Warner, Frances Hodgson Burnett, J. M. Barrie, Kenneth Grahame, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Carolyn Wells, Brothers Grimm, Selma Lagerlöf, Gertrude Chandler Warner, Madeleine L'Engle, Dorothy Canfield, Angela Brazil, Jules Verne

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

e-artnow presents to you this meticulously edited collection of the most revered and influential stories and biographies for the heroines of the future:
Novels:
Little Women 
Anne of Green Gables Series
Rose in Bloom 
Pride and Prejudice
Emma
Jane Eyre
Heidi 
Emily of New Moon 
Alice in Wonderland 
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
The Secret Garden 
A Little Princess 
Peter and Wendy
The Girl from the Marsh Croft
The Nutcracker and the Mouse King 
The Princess and the Goblin 
At the Back of the North Wind 
A Girl of the Limberlost
Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm
Mother Carey's Chickens
Pollyanna 
A Sweet Girl Graduate 
Daddy Long-Legs 
Understood Betsy
The Luckiest Girl in the School 
What Katy Did 
Patty Fairfield
Two Little Women on a Holiday 
Mildred Keith
The Wide, Wide World
The Silver Skates 
Six to Sixteen
The Wind in the Willows 
The Box-Car Children
Five Children and It
The Phoenix and the Carpet
The Story of the Amulet
The Railway Children 
Journey to the Centre of the Earth 
Great Expectations 
And Both Were Young 
Rapunzel
Cinderella
Snow-white
The Twelve Brothers
Little Match Girl
Little Mermaid
Thumbelina…
The Heroines of the Past: Biographies & Memoirs 
     Helen Keller: The Story of My Life 
     Harriet, The Moses of Her People 
     Joan of Arc 
     Saint Catherine 
Vittoria Colonna
Catherine de' Medici
Mary Queen of Scots
Pocahontas
Priscilla Alden
Catherine the Great
Marie Antoinette
Fanny Burney
Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Susan B. Anthony
Catherine Douglas
Lady Jane Grey
Flora Macdonald
Madame Roland
Grace Darling
Sister Dora
Florence Nightingale
Augustina Saragoza
Charlotte Bronte
Dorothy Quincy 
Molly Pitcher
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Madame de Stael
Elizabeth Van Lew
Ida Lewis
Clara Barton
Virginia Reed
Louisa M. Alcott
Clara Morris
Anna Dickinson
Lucretia 
Sappho
Xantippe
Aspasia of Cyrus
Portia
Octavia
Cleopatra
Julia Domna
Eudocia
Hypatia
The Lady Rowena
Queen Elizabeth
The Lady Elfrida
The Countess of Tripoli
Jane, Countess of Mountfort
Laura de Sade
The Countess of Richmond
Elizabeth Woodville
Jane Shore
Catharine of Arragon
Anne Boleyn
Jane Addams ….

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