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A Christmas Carol (Classic Edition With Original Illustrations) - cover

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A Christmas Carol (Classic Edition With Original Illustrations)

Charles Dickens, Arthur Rackham

Publisher: MVP

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Summary

In his "Ghostly little book," Charles Dickens invents the modern concept of Christmas Spirit and offers one of the world's most adapted and imitated stories. We know Ebenezer Scrooge, Tiny Tim, and the Ghosts of Christmas Past, Present, and Future, not only as fictional characters, but also as icons of the true meaning of Christmas in a world still plagued with avarice and cynicis

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