Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
The Night Torn Mad With Footsteps - cover

The Night Torn Mad With Footsteps

Charles Bukowski

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

This collection of previously unpublished poems offers the author's take on squabbling neighbours, off-kilter lovers, would-be hangers-on, and the loneliness of a man afflicted with acute powers of observation. The tone is gritty and amusing, spiralling out towards a cock-eyed wisdom.

Who read this book also read:

  • You can’t bury them all - cover

    You can’t bury them all

    Patrick Woodcock

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Patrick Woodcock has spent the past seven years engaging with and being shaped by the people, politics, and landscapes of the Kurdish north of Iraq, Fort Good Hope in the Northwest Territories, and Azerbaijan. His powerful new collection offers a poetry that simultaneously explores hope and horror while documenting the transformative processes of coping. You can’t bury them all follows the narratives we construct to survive the tragic failures of our humanity to their very end: everything that’s buried by snow, dirt, and ash, just like everything that’s buried by politics, homophobia, sexism, racism, religion, and history is resurrected, demanding to be heard and addressed.
     
    In Woodcock’s poetry, how we deal with what resurfaces is the key. What do those who suffer really mean to those who have abandoned them to small, conscience-soothing charitable donations or the occasional tweet? How can the poet, or anyone else, sleep at night knowing homosexuals are being thrown off building tops, after one steps into a hole and finds an abandoned corpse in an Azeri cemetery, or after the elders of an Aboriginal community are left helpless against those who only want to exploit them? Still, You can’t bury them all demonstrates that the world is not just the horrific place the media often portrays. In each of the worlds he touches, Woodcock discovers a spirit and strength to celebrate.
    Show book
  • The Last Night of the Earth Poems - cover

    The Last Night of the Earth Poems

    Charles Bukowski

    • 0
    • 4
    • 0
    Poems deal with writing, death and immortality, literature, city life, illness, war, and the past.
    Show book
  • Muswell Hill - cover

    Muswell Hill

    Torben Betts

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    One night in January 2010 and an earthquake in Haiti leaves around a hundred thousand people dead and almost two million homeless. Meanwhile, somewhere in a leafy North London suburb, a group of six individuals convene over avocado and prawns, followed by a monkfish stew. They struggle with worries over their mortgages, their mobile phone tariffs, their Facebook friends, their careers, their love lives, their diets, their alcohol intake, their holiday plans and whether or not any of them will be able to make any lasting impression on history.‘Torben Betts is one of the most exciting theatre writing talents I have come across in many a year’ - Alan Ayckbourn ‘Betts has a profound and highly original theatrical voice’ - Daily Telegraph ‘Just about the most original and extraordinary writer of drama we have...a boldly visionary poet... a political Beckett... a flamingly original writer we ignore at our peril.' - Liz Lochhead,National Poet Of Scotland ‘What starts out as a mildly amusing comedy of social dysfunctionality turns into something altogether darker and less comfortable’ – The Stage‘A fantastic new play… accurate and witty writing… This stunning and moving play presented the drama and tragedy of everyday middle class life in a simple but believable style… an absolute triumph’ 5 stars – The Public Reviews
    Show book
  • Wild Ranch: Finding a Helping Hand - M M Western - First Time Gay #1 - cover

    Wild Ranch: Finding a Helping...

    Noah Harris

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    "Lips pressed firmly against his, and he was surprised to find himself being kissed, and not shyly, either. Ryan was kissing him like a starving man, like he had been waiting years for this, and didn’t want to hold back anymore." 
     
    Jay wasn’t sure what to expect when he placed an ad in the newspaper to get some help on the family ranch. He was just hoping to find someone to do the extra work that they had once his youngest brother moved away. The last thing he expected was to find love, but that’s exactly what he got with Ryan.
    Show book
  • The Keeper's Voice - Poems - cover

    The Keeper's Voice - Poems

    Mike Carson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Meeting a local woman at a service project in Appalachia, the narrator of Mike Carson’s poem “Muse” hears from her “Those words, iron twang of loss,” that “cut soft ideas of beauty out.” Carson’s lean, spare collection The Keeper’s Voice unflinchingly engages those hard ideas of beauty, of goodness. 
    
    Direct and often colloquial in their language and traditional in their forms—blank verse, quatrains, sonnets—the poems’ voices arise from a wide range of viewpoints and situations: from an altar boy thawing a frozen gate lock while early Mass goes on without him, to a returning Vietnam veteran who takes up bull riding; from a boy calling cows in the pre-dawn dark, to a narrator providing instructions for teaching crows to talk; from a new cop, a Christian who must shoot to kill in a ghetto bar, to a family discovering the ashes of a stillborn child among a dead sister’s belongings. One poem interweaves locker room slogans with phrases from the Requiem Mass for a friend who died playing football; another centers around a single shout from a wife to her husband threatened by an untethered bull.
    
    Refreshingly straightforward, yet suffused with weight, maturity, and passion, The Keeper’s Voice projects a wise and uncompromising vision.
    Show book
  • Halfway to Silence - Poems - cover

    Halfway to Silence - Poems

    May Sarton

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A striking collection of short poems from acclaimed writer May SartonAfter decades of writing flowing lyric verse, May Sarton’s style turned to short bursts of poetry. Likening poetry to gardening, she writes, “Muse, pour strength into my pruning wrist / That I may cut the way toward open space.” These condensed poems are rife with exuberant impressions of nature and of love. Included are two of Sarton’s most acclaimed poems, “Old Lovers at the Ballet” and “Of the Muse.”
    Show book