If you like reading, you will LOVE reading without limits!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
The Movie Lovers Club - How to Start Your Own Film Group - cover

The Movie Lovers Club - How to Start Your Own Film Group

Cathleen Rountree

Publisher: New World Library

  • 1
  • 5
  • 0

Summary

Large screen TVs and full-line DVD services have liberated movie lovers from fear of parking and stale popcorn. Across the country, movie lovers are staying in and creating their own version of book clubs — but without the homework. The Movie Lovers’ Club — the only guide for movie nights with friends — motivates readers to form their own Lovers’ Club clubs to explore the more than 100 excellent film suggestions, summaries, critical reviews, and insider anecdotes. Author Cathleen Rountree offers a year’s worth of must-see classic, contemporary, independent, and foreign films and provocative discussion questions to keep the cinematic conversation lively. With everything readers need to know to start a Movie Lovers’ Club, the book’s selections run the gamut and include powerful films such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Henry and June, and Real Women Have Curves. Whether you need advice for a political group, a girls’ night out party, or a band of indie film devotees, movie watching reaches new depths with ideas on where, when, and how to launch a film group.

Other books that might interest you

  • Find Your Artistic Voice - The Essential Guide to Working Your Creative Magic - cover

    Find Your Artistic Voice - The...

    Lisa Congdon

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    An artist's unique voice is their calling card. It's what makes each of their works vital and particular. But developing such singular artistry requires effort and persistence. Bestselling author, artist, and illustrator Lisa Congdon brings her expertise to this guide to the process of artistic self-discovery. Featuring advice from Congdon herself and interviews with a roster of established artists, illustrators, and creatives, this one-of-a-kind book will show readers how to identify and nurture their own visual identity, navigate the influence of artists they admire, push through fear and insecurity, and appreciate the value of their personal journey.
    Show book
  • Botticelli - cover

    Botticelli

    Victoria Charles, Emile Gebhart

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    He was the son of a citizen in comfortable circumstances, and had been, in Vasari’s words, “instructed in all such things as children are usually taught before they choose a calling.” However, he refused to give his attention to reading, writing and accounts, continues Vasari, so that his father, despairing of his ever becoming a scholar, apprenticed him to the goldsmith Botticello: whence came the name by which the world remembers him. However, Sandro, a stubborn-featured youth with large, quietly searching eyes and a shock of yellow hair – he has left a portrait of himself on the right-hand side of his picture of the Adoration of the Magi – would also become a painter, and to that end was placed with the Carmelite monk Fra Filippo Lippi. But he was a realist, as the artists of his day had become, satisfied with the joy and skill of painting, and with the study of the beauty and character of the human subject instead of religious themes. Botticelli made rapid progress, loved his master, and later on extended his love to his master’s son, Filippino Lippi, and taught him to paint, but the master’s realism scarcely touched Lippi, for Botticelli was a dreamer and a poet. 
        Botticelli is a painter not of facts, but of ideas, and his pictures are not so much a representation of certain objects as a pattern of forms. Nor is his colouring rich and lifelike; it is subordinated to form, and often rather a tinting than actual colour. In fact, he was interested in the abstract possibilities of his art rather than in the concrete. For example, his compositions, as has just been said, are a pattern of forms; his figures do not actually occupy well-defined places in a well-defined area of space; they do not attract us by their suggestion of bulk, but as shapes of form, suggesting rather a flat pattern of decoration. Accordingly, the lines which enclose the figures are chosen with the primary intention of being decorative. 
        It has been said that Botticelli, “though one of the worst anatomists, was one of the greatest draughtsmen of the Renaissance.” As an example of false anatomy we may notice the impossible way in which the Madonna’s head is attached to the neck, and other instances of faulty articulation and incorrect form of limbs may be found in Botticelli’s pictures. Yet he is recognised as one of the greatest draughtsmen: he gave to ‘line’ not only intrinsic beauty, but also significance. In mathematical language, he resolved the movement of the figure into its factors, its simplest forms of expression, and then combined these various forms into a pattern which, by its rhythmical and harmonious lines, produces an effect upon our imagination, corresponding to the sentiments of grave and tender poetry that filled the artist himself.
        This power of making every line count in both significance and beauty distinguishes the great master- draughtsmen from the vast majority of artists who used line mainly as a necessary means of representing concrete objects.
    Show book
  • John Lennon: The Life - cover

    John Lennon: The Life

    Philip Norman

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    For more than a quarter century, biographer Philip Norman's internationally bestselling Shout! has been unchallenged as the definitive biography of the Beatles. Now, at last, Norman turns his formidable talent to the Beatle for whom being a Beatle was never enough. Drawing on previously untapped sources, and with unprecedented access to all the major characters, Norman presents the comprehensive and most revealing portrait of John Lennon ever published. 
    This masterly biography takes a fresh and penetrating look at every aspect of Lennon's much-chronicled life, including the songs that have turned him, posthumously, into a near-secular saint. In three years of research, Norman has turned up an extraordinary amount of new information about even the best-known episodes of Lennon folklore—his upbringing by his strict Aunt Mimi; his allegedly wasted school and student days; the evolution of his peerless creative partnership with Paul McCartney; his Beatle-busting love affair with a Japanese performance artist; his forays into painting and literature; his experiments with Transcendental Meditation, primal scream therapy, and drugs. The book's numerous key informants and interviewees include Sir Paul McCartney, Sir George Martin, Sean Lennon—whose moving reminiscence reveals his father as never seen before—and Yoko Ono, who speaks with sometimes shocking candor about the inner workings of her marriage to John. 
    “[A] haunting, mammoth, terrific piece of work.” -New York Times  
    Honest and unflinching, as John himself would wish, Norman gives us the whole man in all his endless contradictions—tough and cynical, hilariously funny but also naive, vulnerable and insecure—and reveals how the mother who gave him away as a toddler haunted his mind and his music for the rest of his days.
    Show book
  • Readings of the Vessantara Jātaka - cover

    Readings of the Vessantara Jātaka

    Steven Collins

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Vessantara Jataka tells the story of Prince Vessantara, who attained the Perfection of Generosity by giving away his fortune, his children, and his wife. Vessantara was the penultimate rebirth as a human of the future Gotama Buddha, and his extreme charity has been represented and reinterpreted in texts, sermons, rituals, and art throughout South and Southeast Asia and beyond. This anthology features well-respected anthropologists, textual scholars in religious and Buddhist studies, and art historians, who engage in sophisticated readings of the text and its ethics of giving, understanding of attachment and nonattachment, depiction of the trickster, and unique performative qualities. They reveal the story to be as brilliantly layered as a Homeric epic or Shakespearean play, with aspects of tragedy, comedy, melodrama, and utopian fantasy intertwined to problematize and scrutinize Theravada Buddhism's cherished virtues.
    Show book
  • Halloween - cover

    Halloween

    Murray Leeder

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The 1970s represented an unusually productive and innovative period for the horror film, and John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) is the film that capped that golden age – and some say ruined it, by ushering in the era of the slasher film. Considered a paradigm of low-budget ingenuity, its story of a seemingly unremarkable middle-American town becoming the site of violence on October 31 struck a chord within audiences. The film became a surprise hit that gave rise to a lucrative franchise, and it remains a perennial favourite. Much of its success stems from the simple but strong constructions of its three central characters: brainy, introverted teenager Laurie Strode, a late bloomer compared to her more outgoing friends, Dr. Loomis, the driven, obsessive psychiatrist, and Michael Myers, the inexplicable, ghostlike masked killer. 
    Film scholar Murray Leeder offers a bold and provocative study of Carpenter's film, which hopes to expose qualities that are sometime effaced by its sequels and remakes. It explores Halloween as an unexpected ghost film, and examines such subjects as its construction of the teenager, and the relationship of Halloween the film to Halloween the holiday, and Michael Myers's brand of "pure evil." It is a fascinating read for scholars and fans alike.
    Show book
  • Ivywood Manor - cover

    Ivywood Manor

    Tani Loo

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    When orphan Charlotte Herring arrives at Ivywood Manor, nothing in her experience has prepared her for the gauntlet of living in the ancestral home of the discordant van Kirks. Mr. van Kirk's decision to adopt her is as cloaked in silence as is the truth of Charlotte's past. When the patriarch's preference for Charlotte spawns a one-sided rivalry between her and his son, the injurious dynamic stands in the way of Charlotte's attempts to unravel the family's secrets and her own. Charlotte sleuths from her position at the margins of the family until she discovers and takes utter possession of the knowledge that has been withheld from her and wields it against the monsters of Ivywood Manor.
     
    Tani Loo's atmospheric neo-Gothic debut is a gripping Victorian mystery of a biracial woman coming into power through her victories against violence, inherited lies, and colonial legacies.
    Show book