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New Mexico Food Trails - A Road Tripper's Guide to Hot Chile Cold Brews and Classic Dishes from the Land of Enchantment - cover

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New Mexico Food Trails - A Road Tripper's Guide to Hot Chile Cold Brews and Classic Dishes from the Land of Enchantment

Carolyn Graham

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

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Summary

New Mexico native and travel and food writer Carolyn Graham goes beyond the standard restaurant guide to detail her personal experiences traveling and eating around the state. The result is a distinctive road map of flavors, ingredients, and fusions that bring these New Mexico food trails to life. 
 
This guide is for those who are ready to hit the road and want to be informed about the places they are visiting. It’s for foodies, travelers, adventurers, and eaters who want to go beyond the online reviews to explore the culture and people of New Mexico through its cuisine. New Mexico Food Trails takes readers and road trippers on a tour of the state with their taste buds, through towns large and small, where cooks and chefs are putting their own spin on New Mexico’s most famous ingredients and dishes. Take a delicious journey to find and experience some of the best dishes, drinks, flavors, textures, and terroir in the Land of Enchantment.

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