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Rings of a Tree - cover

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Rings of a Tree

Carolyn Arnold

Publisher: Hibbert & Stiles Publishing Inc.

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Summary

Carolyn Arnold deviates from her typical genre and delves into literary fiction to bring readers Rings of a Tree. This short story draws a poetic correlation between the changing seasons and the stages of our lives and was inspired by the author’s observations of the human journey. It is told through the viewpoint of an oak tree in snapshots of events that take place over generations. 
“It’s a well-told tale. One that will stay with you long after you’ve turned the last page.” 
–Ann Swann, Bestselling author 
“The generational tale she weaves is so true, so honest, that anyone can relate to it and feel compassion for the characters as they go through the trials and successes of life. We only get a sneak peek into their experiences, as we see them through the eyes of an eternal oak tree, but it is no less impactful.” 
–Katie Jennings, Bestselling author 
Another season begins… 
Childhood sweethearts Jake and Cassidy always knew they’d end up getting married, but what they hadn’t been prepared for were the ups and downs that life would present to them. 
Follow their family through generations of celebrations and trials, as told through the eyes and ears of an oak tree.

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