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Finding Mother God - Poems to Heal the World - cover

Finding Mother God - Poems to Heal the World

Carol Lynn Pearson

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

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Summary

Call Her Goddess―call her God the Mother―call her the Feminine Principle―Her children need Her, and our world deeply suffers the pains of Her absence. Through the warmth and the wit of poetry, this book is an invitation for all―women, men, of any religion or of no religion―to welcome Her home and set a permanent place for Her at the family table. 

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