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Crochet Iconic Women - Amigurumi Patterns for 15 Women Who Changed the World - cover

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Crochet Iconic Women - Amigurumi Patterns for 15 Women Who Changed the World

Carla Mitrani

Publisher: David & Charles

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Summary

Crochet patterns depicting world-changing women from Marie Curie to Malala, using the Japanese art of amigurumi. 
 
Whether it's Greta, RBG, or Billie Holiday, this collection of crochet patterns celebrates fifteen women who have made an impact on the global stage in fields like politics, sports, and science. Learn more about each of the characters featured in this collection and make unique gifts to inspire and delight all generations. 
 
Marie Curie • Cleopatra • Queen Elizabeth II • Malala Yousafzai • Rosa Parks • Billie Holiday • Ruth Bader Ginsburg • Serena Williams • Greta Thunberg • Jane Goodall • Amelia Earhart • Jane Austen • Florence Nightingale • Audrey Hepburn • Emmeline Pankhurst
Available since: 10/13/2020.
Print length: 369 pages.

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