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Life and Death in the Battle of Britain - cover

Life and Death in the Battle of Britain

Carl Warner

Publisher: G2 Rights

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Summary

Guy Mayfield was the Station Chaplain at RAF Duxford during the Battle of Britain. His diary is a moving account of the war fought by the young pilots during that summer of 1940, providing a unique and intimate insight into one of the most pivotal moments in British history. Frequently speaking to pilots who knew they may not survive the next 24 hours, Mayfield s diary provides a vivid account of the fears and hopes of the young men who risked their lives daily for the defence of Britain. Interspersed with photographs of the men and contextual narrative by IWM historian Carl Warner, this book brings a compelling and direct new perspective to this historic battle.

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