As many books as you want!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Summary: Black Rednecks and White Liberals - Review and Analysis of Thomas Sowell's Book - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books to choose from, so you can read without limits!

Summary: Black Rednecks and White Liberals - Review and Analysis of Thomas Sowell's Book

BusinessNews Publishing

Publisher: Political Book Summaries

  • 1
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

The must-read summary of Thomas Sowell's book: "Black Rednecks and White Liberals".This complete summary of "Black Rednecks and White Liberals" by Thomas Sowell, a renowned American social theorist and political philosopher, presents his examination of the mistaken assumptions and beliefs about blacks, Jews, Germans, slavery and education. He illustrates the origin of these wrongful assumptions and how they have progressed.Added-value of this summary:• Save time• Understand racial discrimination and the institution• Expand your knowledge of American politics and racial issuesTo learn more, read "Black Rednecks and White Liberals" and discover where misconceptions of certain groups originated from and why.

Other books that might interest you

  • Teaching a Stone to Talk - Expeditions and Encounters - cover

    Teaching a Stone to Talk -...

    Annie Dillard

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    Here, in this compelling assembly of writings, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Dillard explores the world of natural facts and human meanings.
    Show book
  • Synchronicity - An Acausal Connecting Principle (From Vol 8 of the Collected Works of C G Jung) - cover

    Synchronicity - An Acausal...

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Jung was intrigued from early in his career with coincidences, especially those surprising juxtapositions that scientific rationality could not adequately explain. He discussed these ideas with Albert Einstein before World War I, but first used the term "synchronicity" in a 1930 lecture, in reference to the unusual psychological insights generated from consulting the I Ching. A long correspondence and friendship with the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Wolfgang Pauli stimulated a final, mature statement of Jung's thinking on synchronicity, originally published in 1952 and reproduced here. Together with a wealth of historical and contemporary material, this essay describes an astrological experiment Jung conducted to test his theory. Synchronicity reveals the full extent of Jung's research into a wide range of psychic phenomena. 
      This paperback edition of Jung's classic work includes a new foreword by Sonu Shamdasani, Philemon Professor of Jung History at University College London.
    Show book
  • Facing Climate Change - An Integrated Path to the Future - cover

    Facing Climate Change - An...

    Jeffrey Kiehl

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Facing Climate Change explains why people refuse to accept evidence of a warming planet and shows how to move past partisanship to reach a consensus for action. A climate scientist and licensed Jungian analyst, Jeffrey T. Kiehl examines the psychological phenomena that twist our relationship to the natural world and their role in shaping the cultural beliefs that distance us further from nature. He also accounts for the emotions triggered by the lived experience of climate change and the feelings of fear and loss they inspire, which lead us to deny the reality of our warming planet.But it is not too late. By evaluating our way of being, Kiehl unleashes a potential human emotional understanding that can reform our behavior and help protect the Earth. Kiehl dives deep into the human brain's psychological structures and human spirituality's imaginative power, mining promising resources for creating a healthier connection to the environment—and one another. Facing Climate Change is as concerned with repairing our social and political fractures as it is with reestablishing our ties to the world, teaching us to push past partisanship and unite around the shared attributes that are key to our survival. Kiehl encourages policy makers and activists to appeal to our interdependence as a global society, extracting politics from the process and making decisions about our climate future that are substantial and sustaining.
    Show book
  • On Human Nature - cover

    On Human Nature

    Roger Scruton

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    A brief, radical defense of human uniqueness from acclaimed philosopher Roger Scruton 
    In this short book, acclaimed writer and philosopher Roger Scruton presents an original and radical defense of human uniqueness. Confronting the views of evolutionary psychologists, utilitarian moralists, and philosophical materialists such as Richard Dawkins and Daniel Dennett, Scruton argues that human beings cannot be understood simply as biological objects. We are not only human animals; we are also persons, in essential relation with other persons, and bound to them by obligations and rights. Our world is a shared world, exhibiting freedom, value, and accountability, and to understand it we must address other people face to face and I to I. 
    Scruton develops and defends his account of human nature by ranging widely across intellectual history, from Plato and Averroës to Darwin and Wittgenstein. The book begins with Kant's suggestion that we are distinguished by our ability to say "I"—by our sense of ourselves as the centers of self-conscious reflection. This fact is manifested in our emotions, interests, and relations. It is the foundation of the moral sense, as well as of the aesthetic and religious conceptions through which we shape the human world and endow it with meaning. And it lies outside the scope of modern materialist philosophy, even though it is a natural and not a supernatural fact. Ultimately, Scruton offers a new way of understanding how self-consciousness affects the question of how we should live. 
    The result is a rich view of human nature that challenges some of today's most fashionable ideas about our species.
    Show book
  • No Visible Bruises - What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us - cover

    No Visible Bruises - What We...

    Rachel Louise Snyder

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    WINNER OF THE HILLMAN PRIZE FOR BOOK JOURNALISM, THE HELEN BERNSTEIN BOOK AWARD, AND THE LUKAS WORK-IN-PROGRESS AWARD * A NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 BOOKS OF THE YEAR * NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST * LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST * ABA SILVER GAVEL AWARD FINALIST * KIRKUS PRIZE FINALIST  
     
    NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF 2019 BY: Esquire, Amazon, Kirkus, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, BookPage, BookRiot, Economist, New York Times Staff Critics 
     
    “A seminal and breathtaking account of why home is the most dangerous place to be a woman . . . A tour de force.” -Eve Ensler 
      
     "Terrifying, courageous reportage from our internal war zone." -Andrew Solomon 
      
     "Extraordinary." -New York Times ,“Editors' Choice” 
      
     “Gut-wrenching, required reading.” -Esquire 
      
     "Compulsively readable . . . It will save lives." -Washington Post  
     
    “Essential, devastating reading.” -Cheryl Strayed, New York Times Book Review 
      
     An award-winning journalist's intimate investigation of the true scope of domestic violence, revealing how the roots of America's most pressing social crises are buried in abuse that happens behind closed doors.  
      
     We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem. 
      
     In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don't know we're seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths-that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.
    Show book
  • Happy Family - cover

    Happy Family

    James Ellis

    • 1
    • 6
    • 1
    Germaine Kiecke was a foundling, an orphan. 
    
    Now she is a successful art academic who defines herself
    by her profession and prefers to experience the world
    through art and an augmented reality game
    called Happy Family.
    
    					 
    But when the artist Tom Hannah, the creative force behind the
    game, moves to Spain, surrounds himself with high walls, three
    large dogs, and a runaway who teaches him to think like a tree,
    his existential melt-down threatens all Germaine holds dear.
    Show book