Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
The Price of the Haircut - Stories - cover

The Price of the Haircut - Stories

Brock Clarke

Publisher: Algonquin Books

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

From an acclaimed and original writer comes a new collection of stories bursting with absurdist plot twists and laced with trenchant wit. Brock Clarke, author of An Arsonist’s Guide to Writers’ Homes in New England and Exley, among other novels, now offers up bite-sized morsels of his trademark social satire that will have readers laughing, and perhaps shifting uncomfortably in their seats. The title story delivers a cringingly biting dissection of racial attitudes in contemporary America, and Clarke also turns his eagle eye to subjects like PTSD, the fate of child actors, and, most especially, marital discord in stories like “Considering Lizzie Borden, Her Axe, My Wife” and “The Misunderstandings.” In “The Pity Palace,” a masterful study in self-absorption and self-delusion, a reclusive husband in Florence, Italy, who believes his wife has left him for a famous novelist, sells tickets to tourists anxious to meet someone more miserable than they. It’s a distinctly Clarkean world, in which readers find themselves reflected back with the distortion of funhouse mirrors—and swept up on a wild ride of heart-wrenching insight and self-discovery.

Other books that might interest you

  • Planet Panic - Notes from the Queen of Procrastination - cover

    Planet Panic - Notes from the...

    Pam Pastor

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Crazy things keep happening to Pam Pastor and she is left with no choice but to chronicle them. In this second collection of stories, she tells us:
     
    How Pong Pagong ended her shot at stardom;Why her grandma burned all her trolls when she was in sixth grade;How she terrorized her brother on Facebook;Why she became a flower girl at 31;How a New York socialite almost kidnapped her;How she learned survival skills from Bear Grylls; andWhy taxi drivers think she’s the white lady of Balete Drive.
     
    There are also tales about dead rabbits, Potato Corner, thirty bras, hospitals, a missing terrarium, New Kids on the Block, beer, and balikbayan boxes. Fun for the whole family.
    Show book
  • Human Voices - cover

    Human Voices

    Penelope Fitzgerald

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A British radio station struggles through the London blitz, in a “wonderful” novel of World War II England (A.S. Byatt), by a veteran of the BBC.   The nation is listening. It’s 1940, and BBC radio is on the air. Dedicated to the cause, it’s going to do what it does best: keep the British upper lip stiff without resorting to lies. But nightly blackouts and the thunder of exploding enemy bombs are only part of the chaos faced by the staff.   There’s a battle for control between two program directors—one recklessly randy, the other efficient. Their comely assistant is suffering the pangs of unrequited love; an unwed mother is resisting the impending birth of her baby; and an exiled French general takes to the airwaves demanding Britain’s surrender. Then there’s the concert hall itself—a makeshift shelter for the displaced that quickly becomes a hotbed for quick trysts, bloody brawls, private wars between the sexes, political grandstanding, pointless deaths, and overriding fear, as the news unfolds just outside the building’s vulnerable walls.   Inspired by the Booker Prize–winning author’s own wartime experiences at the BBC, Human Voices is a novel at once “funny, touching, and authentic” (Sunday Times, London).   “Made me laugh out loud as I have hardly done since Cold Comfort Farm. It is extraordinary and immensely praiseworthy that a book with such an ultimately serious idea can be so brilliantly funny.” —Country Life   “A tribute to the unsung and quintessentially English heroism of imperfect people.” —New Criterion
    Show book
  • The Paranoid's Pocket Guide - Hundreds of Things You Never Knew You Had to Worry About - cover

    The Paranoid's Pocket Guide -...

    Cameron Tuttle

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Are you worried sick? If not, maybe you should be. Because a pair of drawstring sweatpants could bring about your most embarrassing moment. And a toothpick in your sandwich can be the deadliest of weapons. Including hundreds of bizarre-but-true things that can get you, this compact volume will induce nervous page flipping and make even the most snug and secure folks bona fide paranoiacs. Chilling black and white photographs document the everyday items that menace your safety. But whether it's archibutyrophobia (the fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of your mouth) or phobophobia (the fear of fear itself) that eventually gets you, don't be afraid to buy this book. You never know what might happen to you if you don't.
    Show book
  • Non-Essential Mnemonics - An Unnecessary Journey into Senseless Knowledge - cover

    Non-Essential Mnemonics - An...

    Kent Woodyard

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    McSweeney's columnist Kent Woodyard brings new life to the mnemonic memory devices of a bygone era, from creative reinterpretations of classic mnemonics to original creations of dubious usage. Paired with whimsical illustrations, this book is the perfect gift for the word wizards of the world, as well as collectors of useless pop-culture trivia. 
    Kent Woodyard has been a columnist for McSweeney's Internet Tendency since 2009. He has also written for Relevant Magazine, The Big Jewel, and Yankee Pot Roast. Originally from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Kent now lives in Southern California. This is his first book.
    Show book
  • Oh the Places You'll Eff Up - A Parody for Your Twenties - cover

    Oh the Places You'll Eff Up - A...

    Joshua Miller, Patrick Casey

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    The classic graduation gift Oh, the Places You'll Go sells an average of 300,000 copies each yearPicture books for adults has skyrocketed over the past few years and continues to growThis exposé on the real world graduates face uses grown-up interpretations of well-loved characters everyone will recognize
    Show book
  • Bad Feminist - Essays - cover

    Bad Feminist - Essays

    Roxane Gay

    • 3
    • 23
    • 1
    New York Times Bestseller 
    A collection of essays spanning politics, criticism, and feminism from one of the most-watched young cultural observers of her generation, Roxane Gay. 
    “Pink is my favorite color. I used to say my favorite color was black to be cool, but it is pink—all shades of pink. If I have an accessory, it is probably pink. I read Vogue, and I’m not doing it ironically, though it might seem that way. I once live-tweeted the September issue.” 
    In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture. 
    Bad Feminist is a sharp, funny, and spot-on look at the ways in which the culture we consume becomes who we are, and an inspiring call-to-arms of all the ways we still need to do better.
    Show book