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Losing Found Things - cover

Losing Found Things

Brett Garcia Rose

Publisher: Brett Garcia Rose

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Summary

"We're all broken, and the scars we trade are all that remain of our fragile, once complex lives."

Losing Found Things is the raw, unforgettable debut collection of fifteen short stories from award-winning writer and novelist Brett Garcia Rose, who takes readers past what lies on the surface and into the darkest corners of human experience.

A young man boards a cruise ship planning to jump, and finds an unlikely ally waiting at the railing. A brother and sister slip away from the moving van waiting in their driveway in order to visit their favorite place one last time. Animal rights workers break into a research facility, but the rescue doesnÔÇÖt go as planned. A therapist with her own issues answers suspicious questions about a one night stand. An artist tries to hold onto his fragile, impossibly beautiful model girlfriend as fame pulls her away.

Couples watch the gathering twilights of their love, armed men wait in the woods, lonely people disappear in crowded clubs and city streets. This is the stark world of Brett Garcia Rose, who greets readers with his own autobiographical story ÔÇ£The Spoken World,ÔÇØ which has appeared in multiple anthologies, was nominated for both Best of the Net and The Pushcart Prize, and won the Fiction Attic Short Memoir

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