Discover a world full of books!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
100 Sexiest Women in Comics - cover

100 Sexiest Women in Comics

Brent Frankenhoff

Publisher: Krause Publications

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

Va-Va-Voom!  
For decades, fans have known the secret identities and powers of the beautiful women found in the comic book universe. Now you can savor the visual delights of the 100 Sexiest Women of Comics. From Aspen and Catwoman to Sue Storm and Zatanna, we rank 'em—and tell you a bit about their comics careers in this eye-popping and revealing book.  
Face it, tiger—you just hit the jackpot!

Other books that might interest you

  • Extravagant Abjection - Blackness Power and Sexuality in the African American Literary Imagination - cover

    Extravagant Abjection -...

    Darieck Scott

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Challenging the conception of empowerment associated with the Black Power Movement and its political and intellectual legacies in the present, Darieck Scott contends that power can be found not only in martial resistance, but, surprisingly, where the black body has been inflicted with harm or humiliation.Theorizing the relation between blackness and abjection by foregrounding often neglected depictions of the sexual exploitation and humiliation of men in works by James Weldon Johnson, Toni Morrison, Amiri Baraka, and Samuel R. Delany, Extravagant Abjection asks: If we’re racialized through domination and abjection, what is the political, personal, and psychological potential in racialization-through-abjection? Using the figure of male rape as a lens through which to examine this question, Scott argues that blackness in relation to abjection endows its inheritors with a form of counter-intuitive power—indeed, what can be thought of as a revised notion of black power. This power is found at the point at which ego, identity, body, race, and nation seem to reveal themselves as utterly penetrated and compromised, without defensible boundary. Yet in Extravagant Abjection, “power” assumes an unexpected and paradoxical form.In arguing that blackness endows its inheritors with a surprising form of counter–intuitive power—as a resource for the political present—found at the very point of violation, Extravagant Abjection enriches our understanding of the construction of black male identity.
    Show book
  • Filter Shift - How Effective People See the World - cover

    Filter Shift - How Effective...

    Sarah Taylor

    • 1
    • 4
    • 0
    Filter Shift describes the notion of unconscious filters: how we create them, how we perceive the world through them, and how they control us. The vast majority of are persistently held back by our unconscious biases and misperceptions, even with the best of intentions. Filter Shift explores the unseen dynamics that get in the way, providing a series of blueprints for success.
    Show book
  • Lost Powers - Reclaiming Our Inner Connection - cover

    Lost Powers - Reclaiming Our...

    J. Douglas Kenyon

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Have we lost our way? Lost our psychic “sense of smell”? The conventional notion of the human psyche is that it is a product of our mass culture, and we are conditioned to see and understand only the stimulus that is provided to it. However, there is a deeper process at work, something coming from our innate ability to discern greater truth. Tapping into this subconscious truth-detector is key in determining whether we buy into the premises of the many mainstream “truths” presented to us in popular culture and popular science.In the quest to reestablish that universal connection, editor J. Douglas Kenyon has culled from the pages of Atlantis Rising® magazine this collection of 34 concise and well-illustrated articles by world-class philosophers and theoreticians who offer thought-provoking insights from the lost secrets of ancient and primordial wisdom.Featuring:Secrets of the Alchemists, by Joseph Robert JochmansThe Psi in CSI, by Barbara JasonCan We See into the Future?, by Robert M. SchochPsychokinesis, by Robert M. SchochThe Superhero Factor, by Len KastenDeathbed Visitations, by Michael TymnWar and Reincarnation, by John ChambersTime Travel Evidence, by Joseph Robert JochmansThe Case for Immortality, by Patrick Marsolek
    Show book
  • The Last Kingdom - cover

    The Last Kingdom

    Bernard Cornwell

    • 1
    • 14
    • 0
    The first installment of Bernard Cornwell’s New York Times bestselling series chronicling the epic saga of the making of England, “like Game of Thrones, but real” (The Observer, London)—the basis for The Last Kingdom, the hit  Netflix series. 
    This is the exciting—yet little known—story of the making of England in the 9th and 10th centuries, the years in which King Alfred the Great, his son and grandson defeated the Danish Vikings who had invaded and occupied three of England’s four kingdoms. 
    The story is seen through the eyes of Uhtred, a dispossessed nobleman, who is captured as a child by the Danes and then raised by them so that, by the time the Northmen begin their assault on Wessex (Alfred’s kingdom and the last territory in English hands) Uhtred almost thinks of himself as a Dane. He certainly has no love for Alfred, whom he considers a pious weakling and no match for Viking savagery, yet when Alfred unexpectedly defeats the Danes and the Danes themselves turn on Uhtred, he is finally forced to choose sides. By now he is a young man, in love, trained to fight and ready to take his place in the dreaded shield wall. Above all, though, he wishes to recover his father’s land, the enchanting fort of Bebbanburg by the wild northern sea. 
    This thrilling adventure—based on existing records of Bernard Cornwell’s ancestors—depicts a time when law and order were ripped violently apart by a pagan assault on Christian England, an assault that came very close to destroying England.
    Show book
  • The Guy Davenport Reader - cover

    The Guy Davenport Reader

    Guy Davenport

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    “The difference between the Parthenon and the World Trade Center, between a French wine glass and a German beer mug, between Bach and John Philip Sousa, between Sophocles and Shakespeare, between a bicycle and a horse, though explicable by historical moment, necessity, and destiny, is before all else a difference of imagination.The imagination is like the drunk man who has lost his watch, and must get drunk again to find it. It is as intimate as speech and custom, and to trace its ways we need to re-educate our eyes.”—Guy DavenportModernism spawned the greatest explosion of art, architecture, literature, painting, music, and dance of any era since the Renaissance. In its long unfolding, from Yeats, Pound and Eliot to Picasso and Matisse, from Diaghilev and Balanchine to Cunningham and Stravinsky and Cage, the work of Modernism has provided the cultural vocabulary of our time. One of the last pure Modernists, Guy Davenport was perhaps the finest stylist and most protean craftsman of his generation. Publishing more than two dozen books of fiction, essays, poetry and translations over a career of more than forty years, he was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship in 1990.  In poetry and prose, Davenport drew upon the most archaic and the most modern of influences to create what he called “assemblages”—lush experiments that often defy classification. Woven throughout is a radical and coherent philosophy of desire, design and human happiness. But never before has Davenport’s fiction, nonfiction, poetry and translations been collected together in one compendium. Eight years after his death, The Guy Davenport Reader offers the first true introduction to the far-ranging work of this neglected genius.
    Show book
  • Path to Mandala or Eternal Pilgrimage - 22 levels on pilgrim’s spiritual path - cover

    Path to Mandala or Eternal...

    Asanga Angya

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    POETIC DISCOURSE ON THE CRUCIAL KEYS OF MAN'S SPIRITUALITY
     
    The essence of this poem is marked by the wisdom of nature, the truth of all religious teachings, and the core of quintessential philosophical questions about indivisible identity of nature, man and Creator.
     
    This book is a poetic discourse on the crucial keys of man's spirituality, about the inevitability of searching in the spirit, as a pilgrimage that perpetually transform into the Path to Oneself.
     
     
     
    A note about the author
     
    Asanga Angya (b. 1967) philosopher, religiologist and writer, was raised and educated in Europe, where he graduated in Philosophy and Religious Studies. Since 1990 he has published numerous essays, poems and a few novels in the field of philosophy and spirituality, psychology and art.
     
    About three decades he has explored traditional Eastern and Western ways of self-knowledge as well as the practice of Vedanta and Zen meditation in comparison with the modern teachings of Jungian psychology.
    Show book