Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Come Sunday - cover

Come Sunday

Bradford Morrow

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A densely layered journey into the dark heart of the American Dream that spans continents and centuriesIn Bradford Morrow’s debut novel, lightning-tongued mercenary Peter Krieger travels to Nicaragua to kidnap a man who may be a 480-year-old former conquistador—and therefore could hold the secret to immortality. When Krieger attempts to sell his captive to a reclusive scientist in upstate New York, he sets off on a globe-spanning expedition, in which he encounters an enormous cast of idealists, crackpots, and revolutionaries. And his one-time lover, Hannah Burden, who raises cattle in an illegal loft ranch in Manhattan, still stands between him and his nefarious, astonishing ambitions. A rousingly hilarious, yet tragic epic about the dark side of the American Dream, Come Sunday is fueled by Morrow’s captivating style, breadth of reference, and depth of insight, and spins old myths of the New World into unexpected and haunting forms.
Available since: 02/15/2011.
Print length: 416 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Monster Trucks & Hair-in-a-Can - Who Says America Doesn't Make Things Anymore? - cover

    Monster Trucks & Hair-in-a-Can -...

    Bill Geist

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Anyone who thinks America no longer contributes innovations for public consumption needs to pay attention to Bill Geist. The long-time news correspondent chronicles seven wacky but true entrepreneurial endeavors that prove the American Dream is alive and well—just a tad warped. Where else could you find Bob Chandler who made a fortune by inventing the huge-wheeled behemoth of the arena, the car-crushing monster truck? Or Hall Schlenger, creator of the cable Fish Channel. And what about the legendary Ron Popeil and his Pocket Fisherman, spray-on hair, and Veg-o-Matic? All this could only happen in America, land of whopper-tunity.
    Show book
  • I Want My Epidural Back - Adventures in Mediocre Parenting - cover

    I Want My Epidural Back -...

    Karen Alpert

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Now that I’m a mom, I know the most painful part isn’t getting something giant through your hooha. It’s having a real live child. 
    If you are the kind of mom who shapes your kiddo’s organic quinoa into reproductions of the Mona Lisa, do not read this book. If you stayed up past midnight to create posters for your PTO presidential campaign, do not read this book. If you look down your nose at parents who have Domino’s pizza on speed dial, do not read this book. 
    But if you are the kind of parent who accidentally goes ballistic on your rugrats every morning because they won’t put their shoes on and then you feel super guilty about it all day so you take them to McDonalds for a special treat but really it’s because you opened up your freezer and panicked because you forgot to buy more frozen pizzas, then absolutely read this book. 
    I WANT MY EPIDURAL BACK is a celebration of mediocre parents and how awesome they are and how their kids love them just as much as children with perfect parents. Karen Alpert’s honest but hilarious observations, stories, quips and pictures will have you nodding your head and peeing in your pants. Or on the toilet if you’re smart and read it there.
    Show book
  • Men Women & Manners in Colonial Times - cover

    Men Women & Manners in Colonial...

    Sydney George Fisher

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "In travelling from Massachusetts to the Carolinas one passed through communities of such distinct individuality that they were almost like different nations," writes author Sidney George Fisher in his preface to Men, Women & Manners in Colonial Times, in which he presented the history and culture of colonial America to his Gilded Age contemporaries, who he felt had lost an appreciation of the fascinating circumstances that created the Founding Fathers and the Revolution. In the almost two hundred years of colonial life preceding the Revolution, the colonies displayed a remarkable variety, from their religion, politics, and countries of origin, to their dress, lifestyles, and character. Fisher cites primary documents such as colonial newspapers and the diaries of common men and women as well as famous political figures. He addresses the credibility of legends of our forefathers still told today (George Washington “was an extremely sociable man, and he could not have lived in Virginia and been otherwise”) and the riveting colonial folklore lost to the ages (for instance, "John Randolph, of Virginia, who, seeing a drove of mules passing through Washington on their way to the South, said to Marcy, of Connecticut, 'There go some of your constituents.' 'Yes,’ said Marcy, 'going to Virginia to teach school.'"). Discover colonial architecture, illustrated here with photogravures, and colonial pastimes, including the favorites of George Washington and much of colonial Virginia: card playing and foxhunting. Learn the outstanding literary tradition of Massachusetts, the regularity of fighting off bears in New Hampshire, the popularity of horseracing in Maryland, Blackbeard’s headquarters in North Carolina, the women who ran the South Carolina plantations, the cleanliness of the New York Dutch as they contemplated "their comfort and prosperity while they smoked their pipes . . . willing that the rest of the world would enjoy the same pleasure."
    Show book
  • True Ladies and Proper Gentlemen - Victorian Etiquette for Modern-Day Mothers and Fathers Husbands and Wives Boys and Girls Teachers and Students and More - cover

    True Ladies and Proper Gentlemen...

    Sarah A. Chrisman

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Regardless of time period, some things hold true: kindness is timeless.   Invasion of privacy; divorce; relationship issues; encounters between people from different places and cultures; new technologies developed at dizzying speeds . . . the hectic pace of life in the late nineteenth century could make the mind reel.   Wait a minute—the nineteenth century?   Many of the issues people faced in the 1880s and ’90s were a lot like the problems in today’s modern world, so why not take a peek at some Victorian advice about negotiating life’s dizzying twists and turns? Gathered from period magazines and Hill’s Manual of Social and Business Forms, a book on social conduct originally published in 1891, this volume provides timeless guidance for a myriad of situations, including:   The husband’s duty: Give your wife every advantage that it is possible to bestow.Suggestions about shopping: Purchasers should, as far as possible, patronize the merchants of their own town. (Buy local!)Suggestions for travel: Having paid for one ticket, you are entitled to only one seat. It shows selfishness to deposit a large amount of baggage in the surrounding seats and occupy three or four.Unclassified laws of etiquette: Never leave home with unkind words.   From the author of Victorian Secrets and This Victorian Life, this compendium of advice is accompanied by watercolors and illustrations throughout. Though these are tips originate from nineteenth-century ideas, you’ll find that they certainly do still apply—as well as offering a fascinating and enlightening look at the past.
    Show book
  • The Harry Bogen Novels - I Can Get It for You Wholesale and What's in It for Me? - cover

    The Harry Bogen Novels - I Can...

    Jerome Weidman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Meet one of the most unscrupulous businessmen in American literature—from a New York Times–bestselling novelist and Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright.   Set in Manhattan’s garment district, Jerome Weidman’s debut novel, I Can Get It for You Wholesale, was a scathing satire of capitalist greed as personified by the shameless scoundrel Harry Bogen, who “became an archetypal figure in American literature: the abrasive young man who would do anything to get ahead” (The New York Times).   Weidman’s prose was praised by no less than F. Scott Fitzgerald, who called the book “[a] break-through into completely new and fresh literary terrain; a turning point in the American novel,” and Ernest Hemingway, who enthused: “I think [Weidman] can write just a little better than anybody else that’s around.” The book was a sensation and spawned an “equally hard-driving” sequel, What’s in It for Me?, as well as a movie version and a musical starring Elliott Gould as Harry and featuring Barbra Streisand’s Broadway debut (The New York Times).   As relevant today as when they were first published in the 1930s, both novels are now available in a single volume, featuring a foreword by Alistair Cooke.  I Can Get It for You Wholesale: The stage for this savagely comic novel is Manhattan’s cutthroat garment district, where six thousand manufacturers of dresses are crammed into a few blocks. Their factories are cramped, noisy, and incredibly profitable—and Harry Bogen is going to take them for all they’re worth. A classic conniver, he knows that it’s easier, and a hell of a lot more fun, to turn a buck by lying than by telling the truth. First he convinces the shipping clerks—the pack animals of the garment industry—to go on strike. With the dress manufacturers brought to their knees, Harry will be there to pick them up again. His conscience might be conflicted, if he had one in the first place.   “A slick job of writing, as hard-boiled as a twelve-minute egg.” —The New York Times  What’s in It for Me?: In this sharp-witted sequel, Harry Bogen is again up to his old tricks. After Harry built his empire and became king of the garment district, he blew it up, leaving his partners in jail and securing the whole of the fortune for himself. It takes only three months for Harry to find that retirement does not suit him. His latest scheme starts with an order for one thousand dresses, bought at cut-rate price from a vendor who can’t afford not to sell. From there, Harry raises the stakes, juggling deals and spinning stories as fast as he possibly can. Will he secure himself fortune everlasting, or will this Napoleon meet his Waterloo?
    Show book
  • All Because of a Love Note - How I unwittingly penned my way into the heart of an epic love story while writing thousands of love notes to America's heroes - cover

    All Because of a Love Note - How...

    Natalie June Reilly

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Two words saved my life, two modest, but mighty words—THANK YOU! The most compelling chapter of my story began with a Love Note, one simple handwritten gesture of love, hope and gratitude. 
    My purpose was handed to me in the shape of an envelope, a simple, paper container with a sealable flap that holds a little bit of hope for our everyday heroes. As it turned out, a life of stationery was my destiny, not a stationary life. And it all began on the heels of a broken heart. 
    For the better part of my life, I dreamed of and even prayed for an epic love story, and this is a love story on so many levels. I just never expected it to come at such a great toll. But then again, if you look back through the course of history, the greatest love stories always do. 
    Natalie June Reilly is a freelance writer and every bit her mother's daughter. She is the founder of Nothing but Love Notes, a movement that has inspired a generation of love and gratitude. Somewhere along the way, she unearthed her happy ending, landing the beach, the boy and now the book. None of this would have been possible, if not for God's grace, a mother's love and a handwritten Love Note.
    Show book