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The Freedom Paradox - Is Unbridled Freedom Dividing America? - cover

The Freedom Paradox - Is Unbridled Freedom Dividing America?

Bobby Albert

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing

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Summary

Cutting through the haze of hatred and polarizing politics of our time, The Freedom Paradox offers an unexpected solution to re-unite America.    It was the best of times, and it now seems like the worst of times. The chaos, discord and hostility gripping America today are evident to all.  The root cause of these woes, however, is not so obvious. Using his keen sense of cultural awareness, Bobby Albert answers the questions that are on our hearts and minds, “What happened to the America of our youth?” and “How can we re-claim it?”. Many are fighting for and celebrating their freedoms, but few realize that unrestrained freedom today results in chaos and constraints tomorrow.    Within The Freedom Paradox, readers discover:The “Life and Liberty Equation” and why it’s out of balanceThe competing approaches of principle and expediency  The contrasts and consequences associated with scarcity and abundance mindsets  The impact of what they say and how they say it  The root cause of the problems of their great nation and how they can help

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