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The Invisible Cut - How Editors Make Movie Magic - cover

The Invisible Cut - How Editors Make Movie Magic

Bobbie O'steen

Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

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Summary

The book reveals how the editor like a magician manipulates his audience by using sleight of hand and seduces them by anticipating their needs and desires. Only then can he create those invisible cuts that grab them and keep them on the edge of their seat

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