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Arkie - cover

Arkie

Bobbie Joe Fenison

Publisher: AuthorCentrix, Inc.

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Summary

True stories of country life in the backwoods of Arkansas in the 1940's. Don’t be shocked by some of these stories. This is how we lived. If God had not been watching over this boy more than once, I wouldn’t be writing these stories.

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