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C is for Conquer - Dealing with Cancer and still Embracing Life - cover

C is for Conquer - Dealing with Cancer and still Embracing Life

Bobbi Lynn Sudberry

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing

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Summary

C is for Conquer is a soul-searching and humorous look at cancer that provides comfort to those who are dealing with cancer either directly or indirectly. 

Everyone’s experience with cancer is unique, but everyone shares the journey—one filled with soul searching. People ask why and how it could happen to them and try to discover how to conquer the cancer, so it can’t rear its ugly head ever again. In C is for Conquer, Bobbi Sudberry shares her personal intimacy with breast cancer and her realization of her true inner power and control. Bobbi pulls from journal and blog entries that she kept along her journey, finding humorous ways to deal with the many side effects—all the way to constipation! Others experiencing their own cancer journey or that of a loved one enjoy hearing about Bobbi’s issues with soup and identify with the extreme emotional roller coaster peeking out through the humor. C is for Conquer encourages those who are dealing with cancer to appreciate life with all it throws at them and helps them realize that this is only the beginning and cancer is not the end.

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