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The Murders That Made Us - How Vigilantes Hoodlums Mob Bosses Serial Killers and Cult Leaders Built the San Francisco Bay Area - cover

The Murders That Made Us - How Vigilantes Hoodlums Mob Bosses Serial Killers and Cult Leaders Built the San Francisco Bay Area

Bob Calhoun

Publisher: ECW Press

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Summary

The 170-year history of the San Francisco Bay Area told through its crimes and how they intertwine with the city’s art, music, and politics
		 
In The Murders That Made Us, the story of the San Francisco Bay Area unfolds through its most violent and depraved acts. From its earliest days when vigilantes hung perps from downtown buildings to the Zodiac Killer and the kidnapping of Patty Hearst, murder and mayhem have shaped the city into the political and economic force that she is today.
		 
The Great 1906 Earthquake shook a city that was already teetering on the brink of a massive prostitution scandal. The Summer of Love ended with a pair of ghastly drug dealer slayings that sent Charles Manson packing for Los Angeles. The 1970s come crashing down with the double tragedy of Jonestown and the assassination of Gay icon Harvey Milk by an ex-cop. And the 21st Century rise of California Governor Gavin Newsom, Trump insider Kimberly Guilfoyle, and Vice President Kamala Harris is told through a brutal dog-mauling case and the absurdity called Fajitagate. It’s a 170-year saga of madness, corruption, and death revealed here one crime at a time.

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