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Tantamount - The Pursuit of the Freeway Phantom Serial Killer - cover

Tantamount - The Pursuit of the Freeway Phantom Serial Killer

Blaine L. Pardoe, Victoria R. Hester

Publisher: WildBlue Press

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Summary

A cold case investigation of a notorious serial killer who terrorized 1970s Washington D.C. by the New York Times bestselling true crime coauthors. In 1971 and 1972, a deadly predator stalked the streets of the nation’s capital. His targets were young girls whose fates included rape and torture before their brutalized corpses were left in plain view along busy roadways. Seven victims raging from the ages of ten to eighteen died in his hands. On one victim he left a note, taunting police and claiming the media’s name for him: The Freeway Phantom. Then, as abruptly as he started, the Freeway Phantom stopped. Decades later, Washington DC’s oldest unsolved serial killing spree is pried open with the suspects, the liars, and the evidence laid bare. Father-daughter true crime investigators Blaine Pardoe and Victoria Hester shed new light and provide tantalizing new clues as to who the Freeway Phantom may be.

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