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Another Stupid Trilogy - The Unabridged Anthology - cover

Another Stupid Trilogy - The Unabridged Anthology

Bill Ricardi

Publisher: Bill Ricardi

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Summary

"If your own intelligence was the fuel that your magic ran on, how brightly would you dare to burn?"This box set contains the complete 'Another Stupid Trilogy' story line; an unabridged collection of Sorch's adventures through Panos! And as a BONUS, we've included Sorch's origin story: 'Shaman's Fable'.Bill Ricardi's debut fantasy series, written as the first person diary of an orc who wanted to live a braver life, was an immediate sensation. Podium Publishing quickly secured the audiobook rights, helping to propel 'Another Stupid Trilogy' into the hearts of fantasy fans around the globe.Sorch is an abused orc mage in a world where orcs are cursed with stupidity every time they cast a spell. As a slave to the Voodoo Engine, he was fated to live a short, unrewarding life. While foraging for food one night, Sorch stumbles upon two human mages in big trouble. He saves their lives, and in return they give him an amulet that will make his life easier. Unbeknownst to the humans, their gift grants Sorch the power to break the cycle of intelligence drain and physical abuse. With the help of his friends, Sorch becomes a real mage. He leaves his swamp and embarks on a series of incredibly exciting and dangerous adventures. During his travels he encounters horrible injury, magical treasures, love, snow, university admissions tests, a plot against the Kingdom, and then of course he saves the world. Or does he?Now you can buy the entire trilogy, including the bonus prequel story, for one low price.

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