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Raising Myself - A Memoir of Neglect Shame and Growing Up Too Soon - cover

Raising Myself - A Memoir of Neglect Shame and Growing Up Too Soon

Beverly Engel

Publisher: She Writes Press

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Summary

• Engel is a best-selling author of twenty-two self-help books, many about abuse recovery, and a highly respected advocate and expert on abus recovery who speaks at conferences around the world; most people who buy one of her books usually buy others. 
• Author has a media presence due to her many years of being on TV and radio (most notably The Oprah Show and CNN) and the numerous newspaper and magazine articles that have been written about her books (The Washington Post, LA Times, The Chicago Tribune, Denver Post, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Oprah Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Redbook, Good Housekeeping, Shape, etc.).
• Nearly 700,000 children are abused in the US annually. An estimated 683,000 children (unique incidents) were victims of abuse and neglect in 2015, the most recent year for which there is national data.
• 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys is a victim of child sexual abuse; self-report studies show that 20% of adult females and 5-10% of adult males recall a childhood sexual assault or sexual abuse incident, and according to a 2003 National Institute of Justice report, 3 out of 4 adolescents who have been sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well.

AUDIENCE:
• Anyone who has read any of Engel’s previous books, especially It Wasn’t Your Fault, Healing Your Emotional Self, The Emotionally Abused Woman, The Emotionally Abusive Relationship, and Breaking the Cycle of Abuse
• Former victims of childhood abuse (emotional, physical, sexual)
• Former victims who repeated the cycle of abuse by becoming abusive themselves
• Family and friends of former victims of childhood abuse
• Readers interested in abuse memoirs
• Professionals who work with victims of child abuse

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