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Twelve Stars - Philosophers Chart a Course for Europe - cover

Twelve Stars - Philosophers Chart a Course for Europe

Bertelsmann Stiftung, Twelve Stars Initiative

Publisher: Verlag Bertelsmann Stiftung

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Summary

Twelve Stars presents 24 though-provoking essays by leading European philosophers on the policy choices that the European Union now faces. Proposals include a European basic income scheme; financial regulation that puts people before banks; putting an end to factory farming; making Brexit reversible; and strengthening the role of national parliaments in the EU.
This volume is the result of an exercise in "philosophy in practice", in which thinkers who have a deep concern and connection to the European project engage with European citizens. The authors discussed their proposals with European citizens in online discussions. This book presents key points of discussion from the debates. The debates show that philosophical thinking can help to resolve deep controversies about the future of the European Union.

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